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Photolysis of Aqueous Chlorimuron and Imazaquin in the Presence of Phenolic Acids and Riboflavin

  • Ramarao Venkatesh (a1), S. Kent Harrison (a1) and Mark M. Loux (a1)

Abstract

Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of three phenolic acids, acetone, and riboflavin on aqueous photolysis of chlorimuron and imazaquin. The phenolic acids investigated were caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), and p-coumaric acid (PCA). Treatment solutions were contained in quartz vessels and irradiated with 300 to 400 nm UV light in a photoreactor. The extrapolated photolysis half-life of chlorimuron in pure solution was 107 h, compared to a half-life of 0.42 h for pure aqueous imazaquin. Chlorimuron in solutions containing 10 ppmw riboflavin, acetone, CA, FA, or PCA exhibited half-lives of 9, 57, 58, 67, and 146 h, respectively. Imazaquin in solutions containing 10 ppmw riboflavin, acetone, CA, FA, or PCA had half-lives of 0.70, 0.55, 0.55, 0.48, and 0.55 h, respectively. The presence of PCA in aqueous media delayed chlorimuron photolysis, whereas all other compounds, especially riboflavin, sensitized chlorimuron photolysis. In contrast, imazaquin photolysis was delayed in the presence of the test compounds, with riboflavin having the greatest effect and causing in a 68% increase in imazaquin half-life over that of imazaquin alone. Quantum yields for sensitized photolysis of chlorimuron by riboflavin and for riboflavin by imazaquin were 0.1134 and 0.0477, respectively. These results suggest that some soluble and naturally occurring organic compounds may enhance chlorimuron photolysis yet delay imazaquin photolysis in surface waters.

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Photolysis of Aqueous Chlorimuron and Imazaquin in the Presence of Phenolic Acids and Riboflavin

  • Ramarao Venkatesh (a1), S. Kent Harrison (a1) and Mark M. Loux (a1)

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