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Weed Response, Yield, and Economics of Hexazinone and Nitrogen use in Lowbush Blueberry Production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

David E. Yarborough
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant and Soil Sci., Univ. Maine, Orono, ME 04469
John J. Hanchar
Affiliation:
Dep. Agric., and Resource Econ., Univ. Maine, Orono, ME 04469; currently Agricultural Economist, USDA/ERS/NRED, 1301 New York Ave., NW, Rm. 534, Washington, DC 20005
Steven P. Skinner
Affiliation:
Dep. Agric., and Resource Econ., Univ. Maine, Orono, ME 04469; currently Asst. Prof., Dep. Soc Sci., Western Connecticut State Univ., Danbury, CT 06810
Amr A. Ismail
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant and Soil Sci., Univ. Maine, Orono, ME 04469

Abstract

Field experiments designed to determine the efficacy and interaction of hexazinone [(3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione] and nitrogen on weeds and lowbush blueberry [Vaccinium angustifolium (Ait.)] growth and yield were established at five locations in 1980 and 13 locations in 1981. Hexazinone was applied after pruning, preemergence with nitrogen, using a split-block design, with locations serving as replications. Grasses, goldenrod (Solidago spp.), and meadowsweet [Spiraea latifolia (Ait.) Borkh. # SPVLF] were reduced significantly as the rate of hexazinone was increased. Blueberry injury, plant stand, number of flower buds, and yield all increased with increases in hexazinone rate. Variations in blueberry yields occurred among locations due to differences in plant stand and productivity, as well as climatic and edaphic factors. Within each nitrogen rate, increases in the rate of hexazinone resulted in a quadratic increase in blueberry yield. Within the hexazinone treatments, increasing nitrogen had no effect on yield. Blueberry yield reached a maximum of 3926 kg/ha at a hexazinone rate of 1.83 kg/ha. Partial budgeting was used to evaluate the effect of combinations of hexazinone and nitrogen on net income. Response function analysis determined yield and profit-maximizing combinations of hexazinone and nitrogen. Partial budgeting indicated that hexazinone alone or combined with nitrogen increased net income, but nitrogen without hexazinone decreased net income. Response function analysis indicated that hexazinone at 1.79 kg/ha without nitrogen maximized profits.

Type
Weed Control and Herbicide Technology
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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