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Utility of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Determining the Molecular Influence of Citric Acid and an Organosilicone Adjuvant on Glyphosate Activity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Kurt D. Thelen
Affiliation:
Michigan Dep. Agric. P.O. Box 30017, Lansing, MI 48909
Evelyn P. Jackson
Affiliation:
Dep. Chemistry and Max T. Rogers NMR Facility
Donald Penner
Affiliation:
Dep. Crop & Soil Sci., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI 48824

Abstract

In the discipline of Weed Science, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used extensively for obtaining structural information on herbicide compounds in the areas of herbicide synthesis, metabolism, and environmental degradation. However, little research has been published with regard to the utilization of NMR in determining molecular interactions in the spray solution. The molecular influence of citric add and an organosilicone adjuvant on glyphosate was analyzed with NMR spectrometry. 14C-glyphosate absorption studies showed a decrease in glyphosate absorption by sunflower when Ca2+ was added to the spray solution. This absorption antagonism was overcome with the inclusion of an organosilicone adjuvant. 1H-NMR was used to stow that the organosilicone adjuvant did not directly interact with the glyphosate molecule nor did it prevent the formation of Ca-glyphosate. Citric add was effective in overcoming the Cat2+ antagonism of glyphosate activity when the citric add concentration was 2× or 4× the Ca2+ molar concentration based on plant fresh weight and plant height, respectively. 1H-NMR was utilized to show that citric acid reacted with Ca2+ in solution to produce Ca-citrate and prevent the formation of Ca-glyphosate. NMR was an effective technique for characterizing chemical interactions among the spray solution components.

Type
Physiology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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Utility of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Determining the Molecular Influence of Citric Acid and an Organosilicone Adjuvant on Glyphosate Activity
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