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Stability of corn (Zea mays)-foxtail (Setaria spp.) interference relationships

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017


David A. Mortensen
Affiliation:
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68583–0915
Philip Westra
Affiliation:
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
W. J. Lambert
Affiliation:
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Thomas T. Bauman
Affiliation:
Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Jason C. Fausey
Affiliation:
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
James J. Kells
Affiliation:
Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
Steven J. Langton
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706
R. Gordon Harvey
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706
Brett H. Bussler
Affiliation:
Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO 63167
Kevin Banken
Affiliation:
Central, Morris, MN 56267
Sharon Clay
Affiliation:
South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007
Frank Forcella
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Morris, MN 56267
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Extract

Variation in interference relationships have been shown for a number of crop-weed associations and may have an important effect on the implementation of decision support systems for weed management. Multiyear field experiments were conducted at eight locations to determine the stability of corn-foxtail interference relationships across years and locations. Two coefficients (I and A) of a rectangular hyperbola equation were estimated for each data set using nonlinear regression procedures. The I and A coefficients represent percent corn yield loss as foxtail density approaches zero and maximum percent corn yield loss, respectively. The coefficient I was stable across years at two locations and varied across years at four locations. Maximum yield loss (A) varied between years at one location. Both coefficients varied among locations. Although 3 to 4 foxtail plants m−-1 row was a conservative estimate of the single-year economic threshold (Tc ) of foxtail density, variation in I and A resulted in a large variation in Tc . Therefore, the utility of using common coefficient estimates to predict future crop yield loss from foxtail interference between years or among locations within a region is limited.


Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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