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Soil Temperature and Water Effects on Dissipation of Commercial and Starch Encapsulated Atrazine Formulations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Gordon D. Vail
Affiliation:
USDA, Agric Res. Serv., Insect and Weed Control Res., Dep. Bot. and Pl. Pathol., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47970-1155
Michael V. Hickman
Affiliation:
USDA, Agric Res. Serv., Insect and Weed Control Res., Dep. Bot. and Pl. Pathol., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47970-1155
Marvin M. Schreiber
Affiliation:
USDA, Agric Res. Serv., Insect and Weed Control Res., Dep. Bot. and Pl. Pathol., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47970-1155

Abstract

Experiments were conducted in controlled environment chambers to evaluate the effects of temperature and soil water content on the time of dissipation of commercial (CF) and starch encapsulated (SE) atrazine formulations to one-half the original concentration (T50). SE samples were also analyzed for the amount of atrazine remaining within the starch particles (percent encapsulation). The dissipation of CF atrazine was affected by changes in temperature and soil water content. SE atrazine dissipation was most influenced by changes in soil water content rather than temperature. Independent of soil water, there was no atrazine dissipation from any formulation at 15 C. The T50 for CF atrazine at 20% soil water content was 53.4 and 29.9 d for 25 and 35 C, respectively. At 20% soil water content, all SE treatments gave a T50 greater than 60 d. The percent starch encapsulation at 20% soil water content was greater than or equal to 55.8 and 30.4% for SE large and SE small, respectively. This high level of encapsulated atrazine accounts for the reduced SE dissipation observed at 20% soil water content. At 40% soil water content, the dissipation of CF and SE small atrazine were not different for either 25 or 35 C. Compared to the CF, the SE large formulation extended the T50 by 7.4 and 6.7 d at 25 and 35 C, respectively. At 40% soil water content, there was no encapsulated atrazine present in SE formulations 60 DAT.

Type
Physiology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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