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Response of Cotton and Weeds to Herbicides by Phytobland Oil or Surfactant

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Charles W. Hogue
Affiliation:
Delta Branch, Miss. Agr. and Forest. Exp. Sta., Stoneville, MS 38776

Abstract

In field studies, surfactant and phytobland oil were compared as additives to herbicides and herbicide combinations for postemergence weed control in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. ‘Stoneville 7A’). Addition of phytobland oil to MSMA (monosodium methanearsonate) and MSMA + fluometuron [1,1-dimethyl-3-(α,α,α-trifluoro-m-tolyl)urea], dinoseb (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol), or norea [3-(hexadydro-4,7-methanoindan-5-yl)-1,1-dimethyl-urea] had no significant effect on weed control when applied as directed treatments to weeds in cotton 7 to 15 cm tall. In cotton 15 to 23 cm tall, addition of phytobland oil to MSMA + linuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea] and MSMA + linuron + prometryne [2,4-bis(isopropylamino)-6-(methylthio)-s-triazine] increased weed control when compared to the same treatments with surfactant. MSMA + linuron + phytobland oil decreased cotton yields. Addition of phytobland oil to DSMA (disodium methanearsonate) and DSMA combinations had no effect on weed control when compared to the same treatments with surfactant. There were no differences in several paraffinic phytobland oils or surfactant when used as additives to MSMA + fluometuron for weed control in cotton 7 to 15 cm tall.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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