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Physiological basis for CGA-248757 and flumiclorac selectivity in five plant species

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Jason C. Fausey
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
Donald Penner
Affiliation:
Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Greenhouse and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the physiological basis for CGA-248757 and flumiclorac selectivity in five plant species. CGA-248757 and flumiclorac selectively control weeds postemergence (POST) by inhibiting protoporphyrinogen oxidase (Protox). Injury symptoms from CGA-248757 and flumiclorac include rapid desiccation and necrosis similar to injury from diphenyl ether and bipyridinium herbicides. Species sensitivity to CGA-248757 and flumiclorac was evaluated by comparing the dry weight reduction from POST applications. Abutilon theophrasti was sensitive to both herbicides, Amaranthus retroflexus was more sensitive to flumiclorac than CGA-248757, Brassica kaber was sensitive to CGA-248757 but tolerant of flumiclorac, and Zea mays and Glycine max were tolerant of both herbicides. Studies evaluated CGA-248757 and flumiclorac retention, absorption, translocation, and metabolism. Enhanced herbicide metabolism contributed to the tolerance of A. retroflexus to CGA-248757 and B. kaber to flumiclorac. Decreased herbicide retention, absorption, and translocation coupled with increased metabolism contributed to Z. mays tolerance of CGA-248757 and flumiclorac. Decreased herbicide retention and increased herbicide metabolism provided G. max tolerance of both herbicides.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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