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Influence of Weed Density and Distribution on Corn (Zea mays) Yield

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Mark J. Vangessel
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant Pathol. and Weed Sci.
Edward E. Schweizer
Affiliation:
Water Manage. Res., Agric. Res. Serv., U.S. Dep. Agric, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, 80523
Karen A. Garrett
Affiliation:
Univ. Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Lab, Aiken, SC 29802
Philip Westra
Affiliation:
Dep. Plant Pathol. and Weed Sci., Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO 80523

Abstract

The impact of weed density and weed distribution on irrigated corn yield was investigated in Colorado. Weed densities examined were 0,33,50, or 100% of the indigenous weed population. A series of weed distribution treatments were achieved by varying the length of the weed-free and weedy zones within the corn row while maintaining a constant weed population of 33 or 50% of the indigenous weed level. Grain yield was affected by weed density, but not by weed distribution. Each additional weed reduced corn yield 8.5 and 2.3 kg ha−1 in 1991 and 1992, respectively. When corn yields were estimated with a computer weed/corn management model, weed densities 5 to 8 wk after planting provided a better yield reduction estimate than weed densities immediately before harvest.

Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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