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Controlling Broadleaf Weeds in Soybeans by Bentazon in Minnesota

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Robert N. Andersen
Affiliation:
Agr. Res. Serv., U.S. Dep. of Agr.; Dep. of Agron. and Plant Genetics, Univ. of Minn., St. Paul, MN 55101
William E. Lueschen
Affiliation:
Southern Exp. Sta., Univ. of Minn., Waseca, MN 56093
Dennis D. Warnes
Affiliation:
West Central Exp. Sta., Univ. of Minn., Morris, MN 56267
Wallace W. Nelson
Affiliation:
Southwest Exp. Sta., Univ. of Minn., Lamberton, MN 56152

Abstract

In field studies, bentazon [3-isopropyl-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-(4)3H-one 2,2-dioxide] was applied as postemergence sprays over the top of weeds and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Bentazon at 0.84 to 1.68 kg/ha applied as an early postemergence treatment controlled wild mustard [Brassica kaber (DC.) L.C. Wheeler var. pinnatifida (Stokes) L.C. Wheeler], common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.), velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.), Pennsylvania smartweed, (Polygonum pensylvanicum L.), common cocklebur (Xanthium pensylvanicum Wallr.), and wild common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Pigweeds (Amaranthus sp.) were controlled by applications in the three true-leaf stage but became more resistant at later stages. Control of common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) was erratic. The optimum time for controlling weeds with bentazon was around the first trifoliolate stage of soybeans. Rainfall within several hours after treatment reduced weed control. Eight yield studies, two of which included eight cultivars, were conducted on weed-free soybeans. In none were yields reduced significantly by bentazon at 3.36 kg/ha (the highest rate studied). Eight yield studies were conducted on soybeans infested with common cocklebur or velvetleaf. Weed control was generally excellent with 0.84 kg/ha of bentazon. Where infestations were sufficient to reduce yields, bentazon treatments increased the yields to levels generally comparable with those of the handweeded checks. One exception was an application of bentazon to soybeans growing in a low area that was periodically flooded by heavy rains. In that experiment the benefit of controlling common cocklebur was offset by bentazon injury to the soybeans, and yields from the treated plots were about the same as those of the weedy check.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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