Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-lzpzj Total loading time: 0.29 Render date: 2021-03-04T06:59:03.100Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Comparison of acetolactate synthase enzyme inhibition among resistant and susceptible Xanthium strumarium biotypes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

James M. Lee
Affiliation:
Agronomy Department, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Failure to control Xanthium strumarium with acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor herbicides has been reported in Iowa and surrounding states. Single-seed descent techniques were used to isolate three X. strumarium biotypes: CAM-10 from near Cambridge, Iowa; Colo-25 from near Colo, Iowa; and Ohio-1 from Fulton County, Ohio. Ohio-1 and Colo-25 were selected because of apparent resistance to imazethapyr, whereas CAM-10 was selected for observed sensitivity to imazethapyr. The biotypes were assayed in vitro with three different ALS inhibitor herbicides, and ALS activity was measured. The 50% inhibition values (I50) of ALS for imazethapyr were determined to be ninefold or higher for the Ohio-1 and Colo-25 biotypes compared to the CAM-10 biotype. The I50 for imazaquin was determined to be about ninefold higher for the Colo-25 biotype and sixfold higher for the Ohio-1 biotype when compared to the CAM-10 biotype. All biotypes were equally sensitive to chlorimuron ethyl. The resistance was due to a single dominant nuclear gene.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Al-Khatib, K., Baumgartner, J. R., Peterson, D. E., and Currie, R. S. 1998. Imazethapyr resistance in common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Weed Sci. 46:403407.Google Scholar
Anderson, D. D., Lee, D. J., Martin, A. R., and Roeth, F. W. 1997. DNA sequence comparisons of the acetolactate synthase gene from ALS-resistant and susceptible shattercane. Proc. North Cent. Weed Sci. Soc. 52:42.Google Scholar
Barrentine, W. L. 1989. Minimum effective rate of chlorimuron and imazaquin applied to common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium). Weed Technol. 3:126130.Google Scholar
Bernasconi, P., Woodworth, R. A., Rosen, B. A., Subramanian, M. V., and Siehl, D. L. 1995. A naturally occurring point mutation confers broad range tolerance to herbicides that target acetolactate synthase. J. Biol. Chem. 270:1738117385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bernasconi, P., Woodworth, R. A., Rosen, B. A., Subramanian, M. V., and Siehl, D. L. 1996. A naturally occurring point mutation confers broad range tolerance to herbicides that target acetolactate synthase. J. Biol. Chem. 271:13925.Google ScholarPubMed
Brandle, J. E., Mchugh, S. G., James, L., Labbé, H., and Miki, B. L. 1995. Instability of transgene expression in field grown tobacco carrying the csr1-1 gene for sulfonylurea herbicide resistance. Biotechnology 13:994998.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chaleff, R. S. and Ray, T. B. 1984. Herbicide-resistant mutants from tobacco cell cultures. Science 223:11481151.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Currie, R. S., Horak, M. J., and Rooney, W. L. 1996. Inheritance of imazethapyr resistance in Palmer pigweed (Amaranthus palmeri). Proc. North Cent. Weed Sci. Soc. 51:9798.Google Scholar
Currie, R. S., Kwon, C. S., and Penner, D. 1995. Magnitude of imazethapyr resistance corn (Zea mays) hybrids with altered acetolactate synthase. Weed Sci. 43:578582.Google Scholar
Eberlein, C. V., Guttieri, M. J., Mallory-Smith, C. A., Thill, D. C., and Baerg, R. J. 1997. Altered acetolactate synthase activity in ALS-inhibitor resistant prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola). Weed Sci. 45:212217.Google Scholar
Fehr, W. R. 1991. Principles of Cultivar Development. New York, NY: MacMillan Publishing Company, pp. 367376.Google Scholar
Gaeddert, J. W., Peterson, D. E., and Horak, M. J. 1997. Control and cross-resistance of an acetolactate synthase inhibitor-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) biotype. Weed Technol. 11:132137.Google Scholar
Gerwick, B. C., Mireles, L. C., and Eilers, R. J. 1993. Rapid diagnosis of ALS/AHAS-resistant weeds. Weed Technol. 7:519524.Google Scholar
Greaves, J. A., Rufener, G. K., Chang, M. T., and Koehler, P. H. 1993. Development of resistance to pursuit herbicide in corn the IT gene. Am. Seed Trade Assoc. Corn Sorghum Res. Conf. 48:104118.Google Scholar
Griffin, J. L, Reynolds, D. B., Vidrine, P. R., and Saxton, A. M. 1992. Common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) control with reduced rates of soil and foliar-applied imazaquin. Weed Technol. 6:847851.Google Scholar
Guttieri, M. J., Eberlein, C. V., Mallory-Smith, C. A., Thill, D. C., and Hoffman, D. L. 1992. DNA sequence variation in Domain A of the acetolactate synthase gene of herbicide-resistant and susceptible biotypes. Weed Sci. 40:670677.Google Scholar
Guttieri, M. J., Eberlein, C. V., and Thill, D. C. 1995. Diverse mutations in the acetolactate synthase gene confer chlorsulfuron resistance in kochia (Kochia scoparia) biotypes. Weed Sci. 43:175178.Google Scholar
Hinz, J.R.R. and Owen, M.D.K. 1997. Acetolactate synthase resistance in a common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis) population. Weed Technol. 11:1318.Google Scholar
Mallory-Smith, C. A., Thill, D. C., and Dial, M. J. 1990a. Identification of sulfonylurea herbicide-resistant prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola L.). Weed Technol. 4:163168.Google Scholar
Mallory-Smith, C. A., Thill, D. C., Dial, M. J., and Zemetra, R. S. 1990b. Inheritance of sulfonylurea herbicide resistance in Lactuca spp. Weed Technol. 4:787790.Google Scholar
Murray, B. G., Morrison, I. N., and Brûlé-Babel, A. L. 1995. Inheritance of acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor resistance in wild oat (Avena fatua). Weed Sci. 43:233238.Google Scholar
Punnett, R. C. 1907. Mendelism. Cambridge, MA: Bowes and Bowes. pp. 3555.Google Scholar
Ray, T. B. 1984. Site of action of chlorsulfuron: inhibition of valine and isoleucine biosynthesis in plants. Plant Physiol. 75:827831.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scheel, D. and Casida, J. E. 1985. Sulfonylurea herbicides: growth inhibition in soybean cell suspension cultures and in bacteria correlated with a block in biosynthesis of valine, leucine, or isoleucine. Pestic. Biochem. Physiol. 23:398412.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitzer, P. R., Eilers, R. J., and Cséke, C. 1993. Lack of cross-resistance of imazaquin-resistant Xanthium strumarium acetolactate synthase to flumetsulam and chlorimuron. Plant Physiol. 103:281283.Google ScholarPubMed
Sedcole, J. R. 1977. Number of plants necessary to recover a trait. Crop Sci. 17:667668.Google Scholar
Seefeldt, S. S., Hoffman, D. L., Gealy, D. R., and Fuerst, E. P. 1998. Inheritance of diclofop resistance in wild oat (Avena fatua L.) biotypes from the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Weed Sci. 46:170176.Google Scholar
Seefeldt, S. S., Jensen, J. E., and Fuerst, E. P. 1995. Log-logistic analysis of herbicide dose-response relationships. Weed Technol. 9:218277.Google Scholar
Siehl, D. L., Bengton, A. S., Brockman, J. P., Butler, J. H., Kraatz, G. W., Lamoreaux, R. J., and Subramanian, M. V. 1996. Patterns of crosstolerance to herbicides inhibiting acetohydroxyacid synthase in commercial corn hybrids designed for tolerance to imidazolinones. Crop Sci. 36:274278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spague, C. L., Stoller, E. W., and Wax, L. M. 1997. Common cocklbur (Xanthium strumarium) resistance to selected ALS-inhibiting herbicides. Weed Technol. 11:241247.Google Scholar
Subramanian, M. and Bernasconi, P. 1996. Mapping resistance sites on the acetolactate synthase gene. Implications on the future utility of this site of action. Proc. North Cent. Weed Sci. Soc. 51:97.Google Scholar
Taylor-Lovell, S., Wax, L. M., Horak, M. J., and Peterson, D. E. 1996. Imidazolinone and sulfonylurea resistance in a biotype of common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis). Weed Sci. 44:789794.Google Scholar
White, A. D., Owen, M.D.K., Hartzler, R. G., and Cardina, J. 1998. Evaluation of common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) resistance to acetolactate synthase inhibiting herbicides. Proc. North Cent. Weed Sci. Soc. 53:9697.Google Scholar
Woodworth, A., Bernasconi, P., Subramanian, M., and Rosen, B. 1996. A second naturally occurring point mutation confers broad-based tolerance to acetolactate synthase inhibitors. Plant Physiol. 111:105.Google Scholar
Wright, T. R., Bascomb, N. F., Sturner, S. F., and Penner, D. 1998. Biochemical mechanism and molecular basis for ALS-inhibiting herbicide resistance in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) somatic cell selections. Weed Sci. 46:1323.Google Scholar
Wright, T. R. and Penner, D. 1996. Mechanism of imidazolinone resistance of two sugarbeet somaclonal selections. Proc. North Cent. Weed Sci. Soc. 51:97.Google Scholar
Zhang, J., Cavers, P. B., and Jasieniuk, M. 1993. Response to sublethal herbicide application in early growth of seven Xanthium strumarium populations. Can. J. Plant Sci. 73:351357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 8 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th January 2017 - 4th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Comparison of acetolactate synthase enzyme inhibition among resistant and susceptible Xanthium strumarium biotypes
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Comparison of acetolactate synthase enzyme inhibition among resistant and susceptible Xanthium strumarium biotypes
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Comparison of acetolactate synthase enzyme inhibition among resistant and susceptible Xanthium strumarium biotypes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *