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Amicarbazone, a New Photosystem II Inhibitor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Franck E. Dayan
Affiliation:
USDA-ARS, Natural Products Utilization Research Unit, P.O. Box 8048, University, MS 38677
Maria L. B. Trindade
Affiliation:
São Paulo State University, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, Botucatu, Brazil
Edivaldo D. Velini
Affiliation:
São Paulo State University, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, Botucatu, Brazil
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Amicarbazone is a new triazolinone herbicide with a broad spectrum of weed control. The phenotypic responses of sensitive plants exposed to amicarbazone include chlorosis, stunted growth, tissue necrosis, and death. Its efficacy as both a foliar- and root-applied herbicide suggests that absorption and translocation of this compound is very rapid. This new herbicide is a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, inducing chlorophyll fluorescence and interrupting oxygen evolution ostensibly via binding to the QB domain of photosystem II (PSII) in a manner similar to the triazines and the triazinones classes of herbicides. As a result, its efficacy is susceptible to the most common form of resistance to PSII inhibitors. Nonetheless, amicarbazone has a good selectivity profile and is a more potent herbicide than atrazine, which enables its use at lower rates than those of traditional photosynthetic inhibitors.

Type
Physiology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry
Information
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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