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Absorption and translocation of MON 37500 in wheat and other grass species

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Brian L. S. Olson
Affiliation:
Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506
Phillip Stahlman
Affiliation:
Kansas State University Agricultural Research Center-Hays, Hays, KS 67601
Scott Parrish
Affiliation:
Monsanto, Spokane, WA 99208
Sharon Moran
Affiliation:
Monsanto, St. Louis, MO 63198
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

A growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the effects of temperature and soil moisture on the absorption and translocation of the new sulfonylurea herbicide, MON 37500, in wheat, jointed goatgrass, wild oat, and downy brome. Treatment combinations of temperatures—25/23, 15/13, and 5/3 C—and soil moistures of one-third, two-thirds, and full field capacities were assigned to the germinated plants. Radiolabeled MON 37500 was applied to the second leaf of plants at the three-leaf stage. The plants were then harvested at 6, 24, and 96 h after application. The plants absorbed MON 37500 in the greatest quantity during the first 6 h; however, absorption did continue to increase over time. Absorption was highest in wheat and lowest in wild oat. Temperature influenced absorption, while soil moisture status appeared to have no effect. Translocation of radiolabeled material out of the treated leaf increased over time; however, 90 to 97% of absorbed radioactivity remained in the treated leaf 96 h after treatment. Temperature affected translocation differently in each species, but increasing soil moisture increased translocation.

Type
Physiology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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