Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-4z9h4 Total loading time: 0.385 Render date: 2021-04-12T05:14:38.147Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Dark-suppression and light-sensitization of horizontal cell responses in the hybrid bass retina

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2009

William H. Baldridge
Affiliation:
The Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole
Reto Weiler
Affiliation:
The Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole
John E. Dowling
Affiliation:
The Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole

Abstract

The responsiveness of luminosity-type horizontal cells, recorded intracellularly from isolated hybrid bass retinas, decreased after superfusion for 2 h in constant darkness. Responsiveness was subsequently increased (light-sensitized) up to 10-fold after exposure to several short (~0.5 min) periods of continuous illumination. The increase in horizontal cell responsiveness following light-sensitization was due to an increase of peak response amplitude rather than a reduction of peak response time. The increased responsiveness after light-sensitization was intensity-dependent with brighter sensitizing stimuli causing a greater increase than dimmer stimuli. The extent of LHC dark-suppression was affected by the time of day, being greater when induced during the night than during the day. However, there was no significant difference in horizontal cell responsiveness after light-sensitization in retinas studied during the night compared to those studied during the day The responsiveness of light-sensitized horizontal cells from isolated hybrid bass retinas was found to be suppressed by relatively brief periods of darkness. The responsiveness of horizontal cells, that were first light-sensitized, decreased by more than 50% following only 5 min of darkness. Suppression of light-sensitized horizontal cell responsiveness after such a short time in the dark has not been described in other teleost retinas. The suppression of light-sensitized horizontal cell responsiveness in hybrid bass retinas may be rapid in comparison to other teleosts.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Akopian, A., McReynolds, J. & Weiler, R. (1991). Short-term potentiation of off-responses in turtle horizontal cells. Brain Research 546, 132138.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baldridge, W.H. & Ball, A.K. (1991). Background illumination reduces horizontal cell receptive-field size in both normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned goldfish retinas. Visual Neuroscience 7, 441450.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barlow, H.B., Fitzhugh, R. & Kuffler, S.W. (1957). Change of organization in the receptive fields of the cat's retina during dark adaptation. Journal of Physiology (London) 137, 338354.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baylor, D.A. & Hodgkin, A.L. (1974). Changes in time scale and sensitivity in turtle photoreceptors. Journal of Physiology (London) 242, 729758.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dearry, A. & Burnside, B. (1989). Light-induced dopamine release from teleost retinas acts as a light-adaptive signal to the retinal pigment epithelium. Journal of Neurochemistry 53, 870878.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Douglas, R.H., Wagner, H.-J., Zaunreiter, M., Behrens, U.D. & Djamgoz, M.B.A. (1992). The effect of dopamine depletion on lightevoked and circadian retinomotor movements in the teleost retina. Visual Neuroscience 9, 335344.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dowling, J.E. & Ripps, H. (1971). S-potentials in the skate retina: Intracellular recordings during light and dark adaptation. Journal of General Physiology 58, 163189.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hedden, W.L. & Dowling, J.E. (1978). The interplexiform cell system. II. Effects of dopamine on goldfish retinal neurons. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 201, 2755.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kleinschmidt, J. & Dowling, J.E. (1975). Intracellular recordings from gecko photoreceptors during light and dark adaptation. Journal of General Physiology 66, 617648.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kohler, K., Kolbinger, W., Kurz-Isler, G. & Weiler, R. (1990). Endogenous dopamine and cyclic events in the fish retina, II. Correlation of retinomotor movement, spinule formation, and connexon density of gap junctions with dopamine activity during light/dark cycles. Visual Neuroscience 5, 417428.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kolbinger, W., Kohler, K., Oetting, H. & Weiler, R. (1990). Endogenous dopamine and cyclic events in the fish retina, I. PLC assay of total content, release, and metabolic turnover during different light/dark cycles. Visual Neuroscience 5, 143149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mangel, S.C. & Dowling, J.E. (1985). Responsiveness and recptivefield size of carp horizontal cells are reduced by prolonged darkness and dopamine. Science 229, 11071109.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mangel, S.C. & Dowling, J.E. (1987). The interplexiform-horizontal cell system in the fish retina: Effect of dopamine, light stimulation and time in the dark. Proceedings of the Royal Society B (London) 231, 91121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mangel, S.C. & Wang, Y. (1994). Circadian clock in goldfish retina regulates the effects of dark adaptation on horizontal cell light responses. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (ARVO Suppl.) 35, 1364.Google Scholar
Mangel, S.C., Baldridge, W.H., Weiler, R. & Dowling, J.E. (1994). Threshold and chromatic sensitivity changes in fish cone horizontal cells following prolonged darkness. Brain Research 659, 5561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCormack, C.A. & Burnside, B. (1991). Effects of circadian phase on cone retinomotor movements in the Midas cichlid. Experimental Eye Research 52, 431438.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Normann, R.A. & Perlman, I. (1979). Signal transmission from red cones to horizontal cells in the turtle retina. Journal of Physiology (London) 286, 509524.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Perlman, I., Sullivan, J.M. & Normann, R.A. (1993). Voltage- and time-dependent potassium conductances enhance the frequency response of horizontal cells in the turtle retina. Brain Research 619, 8997.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pierce, M.E. & Besharse, J.C. (1985). Circadian regulation of retinomotor movements: I. Interaction of melatonin and dopamine in the control of cone length. Journal of General Physiology 86, 671689.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Raynauld, J.-P., Laviolette, J.R. & Wagner, H.-J. (1979). Goldfish retina: A correlate between cone activity and morphology of the horizontal cell in cone pedicles. Science 204, 14361438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Umino, O., Lee, Y. & Dowling, J.E. (1991). Effect of light stimuli on the release of dopamine from interplexiform cells in the white perch retina. Visual Neuroscience 7, 451458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wagner, H.-J., Behrens, U.D., Zaunreiter, M. & Douglas, R.H. (1992). The circadian component of spinule dynamics in teleost retinal horizontal cells is dependent on the dopaminergic system. Visual Neuroscience 9, 345351.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Weiler, R., Kolbinger, W. & Kohler, K. (1989). Reduced light responsiveness of the cone pathway during prolonged darkness does not result from an increase of dopaminergic activity in the fish retina. Neuroscience Letters 99, 214218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Witkovsky, P. & Shi, X.-P. (1990). Slow light and dark adaptation of horizontal cells in the Xenopus retina: A role for endogenous dopamine. Visual Neuroscience 5, 405413.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Witkovsky, P., Nicholson, C., Rice, M.E., Bohmaker, K. & Meller, E. (1993). Extracellular dopamine concentration in the retina of the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.A. 90, 56675671.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, X.-L., Tornqvist, K. & Dowling, J.E. (1988 a). Modulation of cone horizontal cell activity in the teleost fish retina. I. Effects of prolonged darkness and background illumination on light responsiveness. Journal of Neuroscience 8, 22592268.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, X.-L., Tornqvist, K. & Dowling, J.E. (1988 b). Modulation of cone horizontal cell activity in the teleost fish retina. II. Role of interplexiform cells and dopamine in regulating light responsiveness. Journal of Neuroscience 8, 22692278.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, X.-L., Fan, T.-X., & Shen, W. (1994). Effects of prolonged darkness on light responsiveness and spectral sensitivity of cone horizontal cells in carp retina in vivo. Journal of Neuroscience 14, 326334.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 6 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dark-suppression and light-sensitization of horizontal cell responses in the hybrid bass retina
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Dark-suppression and light-sensitization of horizontal cell responses in the hybrid bass retina
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Dark-suppression and light-sensitization of horizontal cell responses in the hybrid bass retina
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *