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Convergence of processing channels in the extrastriate cortex of monkeys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2009

Leah Krubitzer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville
Jon Kaas
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville

Abstract

The first (V-I) and second (V-II) visual areas of primates contain three types of anatomical segregations of neurons as parts of hypothesized “P-B” or “color”, “P-I” or “form,” and “M” or “motion” processing channels. These channels remain distinct in relays of P-B and P-I information to the inferior temporal lobe via V-II and dorsolateral visual cortex for object recognition, and “M” information to posterior parietal cortex via the middle temporal visual area (MT) for visual tracking and attention. The present anatomical experiments demonstrate another channel where “P-B” modules in V-I and “P-B” and “M” modules in V-II merge in the projections to the dorsomedial visual area (DM), which relays to MT and posterior parietal cortex. This integrative area may function in unifying our perception of the visual world, and may allow “color” as well as “motion” to play a role in visual tracking and attention.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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