Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-c5xhk Total loading time: 1.449 Render date: 2021-05-13T10:13:57.885Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Use of Monozygotic Twins in Search for Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2012

Asta Försti
Affiliation:
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Sweden. asta.forsti@cnt.ki.se
Qianren Jin
Affiliation:
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Lena Sundqvist
Affiliation:
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Magnus Söderberg
Affiliation:
Department of Pathology, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Kari Hemminki
Affiliation:
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We have used Swedish monozygotic twins concordant for breast cancer to study genetic changes associated with the development of breast cancer. Because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at a specific genomic region may reflect the presence of a tumour suppressor gene, loss of the same allele in both of the twins concordant for breast cancer may pinpoint a tumour suppressor gene that confers a strong predisposition to breast cancer. DNA samples extracted from the matched tumour and normal tissues of nine twin pairs were analysed for allelic imbalance using a set of microsatellite markers on chromosomes 1, 13, 16 and 17, containing loci with known tumour suppressor genes. The two main regions, where more twin pairs than expected had lost the same allele, were located at 16qtel, including markers D16S393, D16S305 and D16S413, and at 17p13, distal to the p53 locus. Our results show that the monozygotic twin model can be used to suggest candidate regions of potential tumour suppressor genes, even with a limited number of twin pairs.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2001
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Use of Monozygotic Twins in Search for Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Use of Monozygotic Twins in Search for Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Use of Monozygotic Twins in Search for Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *