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Phenotypic, Genetic, and Environmental Relationships Between Self-Reported Talents and Measured Intelligence

  • Julie Aitken Schermer (a1), Andrew M. Johnson (a2), Kerry L. Jang (a3) and Philip A. Vernon (a4)

Abstract

The relationship between self-report abilities and measured intelligence was examined at both the phenotypic (zero-order) level as well as at the genetic and environmental levels. Twins and siblings (N = 516) completed a timed intelligence test and a self-report ability questionnaire, which has previously been found to produce 10 factors, including: politics, interpersonal relationships, practical tasks, intellectual pursuits, academic skills, entrepreneur/business, domestic skills, vocal abilities, and creativity. At the phenotypic level, the correlations between the ability factor scores and intelligence ranged from 0.01 to 0.42 (between self-report academic abilities and verbal intelligence). Further analyses found that some of the phenotypic relationships between self-report ability scores and measured intelligence also had significant correlations at the genetic and environmental levels, suggesting that some of the observed relationships may be due to common genetic and/or environmental factors.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

address for correspondence: Julie Aitken Schermer, Management and Organizational Studies, Faculty of Social Science, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2. E-mail: jharris@uwo.ca

References

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Keywords

Phenotypic, Genetic, and Environmental Relationships Between Self-Reported Talents and Measured Intelligence

  • Julie Aitken Schermer (a1), Andrew M. Johnson (a2), Kerry L. Jang (a3) and Philip A. Vernon (a4)

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