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Constraint Answer Set Programming without Grounding

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2018

JOAQUIN ARIAS
Affiliation:
IMDEA Software Institute and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (e-mail: joaquin.arias@imdea.org, joaquin.arias@alumnos.upm.es, manuel.carro@imdea.org, manuel.carro@upm.es)
MANUEL CARRO
Affiliation:
IMDEA Software Institute and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (e-mail: joaquin.arias@imdea.org, joaquin.arias@alumnos.upm.es, manuel.carro@imdea.org, manuel.carro@upm.es)
ELMER SALAZAR
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Dallas (e-mail: ees101020@utdallas.edu, kmarple1@utdallas.edu, gupta@utdallas.edu)
KYLE MARPLE
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Dallas (e-mail: ees101020@utdallas.edu, kmarple1@utdallas.edu, gupta@utdallas.edu)
GOPAL GUPTA
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Dallas (e-mail: ees101020@utdallas.edu, kmarple1@utdallas.edu, gupta@utdallas.edu)
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Abstract

Extending ASP with constraints (CASP) enhances its expressiveness and performance. This extension is not straightforward as the grounding phase, present in most ASP systems, removes variables and the links among them, and also causes a combinatorial explosion in the size of the program. Several methods to overcome this issue have been devised: restricting the constraint domains (e.g., discrete instead of dense), or the type (or number) of models that can be returned. In this paper we propose to incorporate constraints into s(ASP), a goal-directed, top-down execution model which implements ASP while retaining logical variables both during execution and in the answer sets. The resulting model, s(CASP), can constrain variables that, as in CLP, are kept during the execution and in the answer sets. s(CASP) inherits and generalizes the execution model of s(ASP) and is parametric w.r.t. the constraint solver. We describe this novel execution model and show through several examples the enhanced expressiveness of s(CASP) w.r.t. ASP, CLP, and other CASP systems. We also report improved performance w.r.t. other very mature, highly optimized ASP systems in some benchmarks.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

Footnotes

*Work partially supported by EIT Digital (https://eitdigital.eu), MINECO project TIN2015-67522-C3-1-R (TRACES), Comunidad de Madrid project S2013/ICE-2731 N-Greens Software, NSF IIS 1718945, and NSF IIS 1423419.

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