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On local domain symmetry for model expansion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 October 2016

JO DEVRIENDT
Affiliation:
KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200A, Leuven, Belgium (e-mail: firstname.lastname@cs.kuleuven.be)
BART BOGAERTS
Affiliation:
KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200A, Leuven, Belgium (e-mail: firstname.lastname@cs.kuleuven.be) Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT, Aalto University, FI-00076 AALTO, Finland
MAURICE BRUYNOOGHE
Affiliation:
KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200A, Leuven, Belgium (e-mail: firstname.lastname@cs.kuleuven.be)
MARC DENECKER
Affiliation:
KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200A, Leuven, Belgium (e-mail: firstname.lastname@cs.kuleuven.be)
Corresponding

Abstract

Symmetry in combinatorial problems is an extensively studied topic. We continue this research in the context of model expansion problems, with the aim of automating the workflow of detecting and breaking symmetry. We focus on local domain symmetry, which is induced by permutations of domain elements, and which can be detected on a first-order level. As such, our work is a continuation of the symmetry exploitation techniques of model generation systems, while it differs from more recent symmetry breaking techniques in answer set programming which detect symmetry on ground programs. Our main contributions are sufficient conditions for symmetry of model expansion problems, the identification of local domain interchangeability, which can often be broken completely, and efficient symmetry detection algorithms for both local domain interchangeability as well as local domain symmetry in general. Our approach is implemented in the model expansion system IDP, and we present experimental results showcasing the strong and weak points of our approach compared to sbass, a symmetry breaking technique for answer set programming.

Type
Regular Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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