Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access
  • Open access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Unfair playing field
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Unfair playing field
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Unfair playing field
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

I fully agree with the change of the name of The Psychiatrist to the Psychiatric Bulletin. 1 The phrase ‘unfair playing field’ is very important. For the past 50 years in psychiatric publishing it would appear that there were serious conflicts of interest not declared. For example, an editor and reviewers have reviewed papers where they are competing for research funds in the same areas as the papers submitted. In addition, many of these same people have been on committees deciding on funding for research in the same area as the paper that is being submitted or have other associations with the authors of the paper of one kind or another. Serious conflicts of interest particularly related to the ‘golden circle’ of people who are both editors, submitters of papers and on funding bodies. This controls what is allowed to be published and what topics are allowed to be funded and has damaged research and publication in the past 50 years. In a way it seems as if ‘might is right’ - the mighty being inside the golden publishing circle. It would be interesting for somebody to do a review of publications in psychiatry journals for the past 50 years to see where these conflicts of interest occurred and were undeclared. It is probably a more sociological task.

1 Pimm, J. Scientific publishing – an unfair playing field. Psychiatrist 2013; 37: 281–2.