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Experiences of cognitive behavioural therapy formulation in clients with depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2014

Sandeep Kahlon
Affiliation:
Oxford Health NHS, Oxford, UK
Adrian Neal
Affiliation:
Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership Trust, Coventry, UK
Tom G. Patterson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK
Corresponding

Abstract

While clinicians have described the benefits of using formulations within therapy, little is understood about the client's experience of the formulation process. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is currently the treatment of choice for many adult mental health difficulties. However, research exploring clients’ experiences of CBT formulation is very limited. The present study set out to explore experiences of CBT formulation in clients with depression. Seven participants were interviewed and the data analysed using Thematic Analysis. The analysis identified key themes such as: ‘Feeling trapped or restricted by depression’, ‘The development of the formulation – from coming to my own conclusions to something the therapist developed’, ‘From negative to mixed feelings: emotional reactions to the formulation during the therapeutic process’ and ‘A new journey: towards making a new sense of oneself’. The results of the study highlight the personal and emotional challenge of the formulation process for clients.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2014 

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