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Use of second-person pronouns and schizophrenia

  • Andrew R. Watson (a1), Çaǧla Defteralı (a2), Thomas H. Bak (a2), Antonella Sorace (a2), Andrew M. McIntosh (a3), David G. C. Owens (a3), Eve C. Johnstone (a3) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a3)...

Summary

A masked analysis of videotaped assessments of people at high genetic risk of schizophrenia revealed that those who subsequently went on to develop schizophrenia used significantly more second-person pronouns. This was evident before diagnosis, at two separate assessments approximately 18 months apart. This supports the view that people who go on to develop schizophrenia may have an abnormality in the deictic frame of interpersonal communication – that is, the distinction between concepts being self-generated or from elsewhere may be blurred prior to the onset of a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Andrew Watson, Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh, Kennedy Tower, Royal Edinburgh Hospital, Morningside Place, Edinburgh EH10 5HF, UK. Email: awatson3@nhs.net

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Declaration of interest

None.

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References

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Use of second-person pronouns and schizophrenia

  • Andrew R. Watson (a1), Çaǧla Defteralı (a2), Thomas H. Bak (a2), Antonella Sorace (a2), Andrew M. McIntosh (a3), David G. C. Owens (a3), Eve C. Johnstone (a3) and Stephen M. Lawrie (a3)...
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