Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access
  • Cited by 41

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Physiotherapists can help implement physical activity programmes in clinical practice
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Physiotherapists can help implement physical activity programmes in clinical practice
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Physiotherapists can help implement physical activity programmes in clinical practice
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

We read with great interest the editorial by McNamee et al. Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 The authors made an important call for evidence-based physical activity research and interventions to reduce the physical health disparity seen in people with schizophrenia. Since this an area which is constantly evolving, we wanted to highlight some new evidence that is available that may assist clinicians and researchers to develop evidence-based physical activity interventions.

McNamee et al Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 report some important barriers to physical activity uptake and maintenance. However, our understanding of the barriers to physical activity participation go beyond negative symptoms, side-effects of medication and social isolation. Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 Recent review evidence Reference Vancampfort, Knapen, Probst, Scheewe, Remans and De2 incorporating 25 013 people with schizophrenia provides further indications of specific barriers which should be considered in this population. This comprehensive review Reference Vancampfort, Knapen, Probst, Scheewe, Remans and De2 suggests that cardiometabolic comorbidity, lack of knowledge on cardiovascular disease risk factors, lower self-efficacy and other unhealthy lifestyle habits, including smoking, must be carefully considered as barriers when developing physical activity interventions for patients with schizophrenia.

We agree with McNamee et al Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 that there is a high need for theoretically based research on the motivational processes linked to the commencement and continuation of physical activity in patients with schizophrenia. Research has recently started to meet this call. New evidence relying on the self-determination theory Reference Vancampfort, De Hert, Vansteenkiste, De, Scheewe and Soundy3 suggests that people with schizophrenia’s level of autonomous motivation towards an active lifestyle (which involves the experience of volition and choice), feelings of competence and social relatedness may play an important role in the adoption and maintenance of physical activity.

We also agree with McNamee et al Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 that it is essential that all members of the mental health multidisciplinary team (MDT) should promote and empower people with schizophrenia to engage in physical activity. The International Organization of Physical Therapists in Mental Health (IOPTMH) Reference Vancampfort, De Hert, Skjaerven, Gyllensten, Parker and Mulders4 recently emphasised that the mental health MDT’s approach to the care of patients with schizophrenia should take this into account, at both policy-making and clinical levels. Without this crucial step the physical health of patients with schizophrenia is unlikely to be improved. The IOPTMH therefore endorses the editorial of McNamee et al Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 that active physical health promotion must be routinely included in the care plans of people with schizophrenia and accepted as the responsibility of all healthcare staff. The IOPTMH is committed to supporting future research in this field and believes that physiotherapists are well placed to lead the translation of physical activity in clinical practice, Reference Stubbs, Soundy, Probst, De, De and Vancampfort5 which McNamee et al Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 called for. Future research is required and this should, for example, define which strategies mental health physiotherapists should adopt in order to assist persons with schizophrenia in the transition from hospital to community care. Reference Vancampfort, De Hert, Skjaerven, Gyllensten, Parker and Mulders4,Reference Stubbs, Soundy, Probst, De, De and Vancampfort5 Together with McNamee et al, Reference McNamee, Mead, MacGillivray and Lawrie1 we are convinced that this is essential in order to ensure that physical activity is successfully used to significantly improve the physical health and health-related quality of life of people with schizophrenia.

1 McNamee, L, Mead, G, MacGillivray, S, Lawrie, SM. Schizophrenia, poor physical health and physical activity: evidence-based interventions are required to reduce major health inequalities. Br J Psychiatry 2013; 203: 239–41.
2 Vancampfort, D, Knapen, J, Probst, M, Scheewe, T, Remans, S, De, Hert M. A systematic review of correlates of physical activity in patients with schizophrenia. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2012; 125: 352–62.
3 Vancampfort, D, De Hert, M, Vansteenkiste, M, De, Herdt A, Scheewe, TW, Soundy, A, et al. The importance of self-determined motivation towards physical activity in patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatr Res 2013; 210: 812–8.
4 Vancampfort, D, De Hert, M, Skjaerven, L, Gyllensten, A, Parker, A, Mulders, N, et al. International Organization of Physical Therapy in Mental Health consensus on physical activity within multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes for minimising cardio-metabolic risk in patients with schizophrenia. Disabil Rehabil 2012; 34: 112.
5 Stubbs, B, Soundy, A, Probst, M, De, Hert M, De, Herdt A, Vancampfort, D. Understanding the role of physiotherapists in schizophrenia: an International perspective from members of the International Organisation of Physical Therapists in Mental Health (IOPTMH). J Ment Health 2013; in press.