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Contextual Assessment of the Maternity Experience: development of an instrument for cross-cultural research

  • Odette Bernazzani (a1), Sue Conroy (a2), Maureen N. Marks (a2), Kathryn A. Siddle (a2), Nicole Guedeney (a3), Antonia Bifulco (a4), Paul Asten (a5), Barbara Figueiredo (a6), Laura L. Gorman (a7), Simona Bellini (a8), Elisabeth Glatigny-Dallay (a9), Sandra Hayes (a10), Claudia M. Klier (a11), Martin H. Kammerer (a12), Carol A. Henshaw (a13) and TCS–PND Group...

Abstract

Background

There is evidence that stressors may trigger the onset of a depressive episode in vulnerable women. A new UK interview measure, the Contextual Assessment of the Maternity Experience (CAME), was designed to assess major risk factors for emotional disturbances, especially depression, during pregnancy and post-partum.

Aims

Within the context of a cros-scultural study, to establish the use fulness of the CAME, and to test expected associations of the measure with characteristics of the social context and with major or minor depression.

Method

The CAME was administered antenatally and postnatally in ten study sites, respectively to 296 and 249 women. Affective disorder throughout pregnancy and upto 6 month spostnatally was assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–IV Axis I Disorders.

Results

Adversity, poor relationship with either a partner or a confidant, and negative feelings about the pregnancy all predicted onset of depression during the perinatal period.

Conclusions

The CAME was able to assess major domains relevant to the psychosocial context of the maternity experience in different cultures. Overall, the instrument showed acceptable psychometric properties in its first use in different cultural settings.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Odette Bernazzani, Pavillon Rosemont, Département de Psychiatrie, 5689 Boulevard Rosemont, Montréal, Québec, Canada H1T 2H1. E-mail: o.bernazzani@umontreal.ca

Footnotes

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TCS–PND Group membership and funding detailed in Acknowledgements, p. iv, this supplement.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Contextual Assessment of the Maternity Experience: development of an instrument for cross-cultural research

  • Odette Bernazzani (a1), Sue Conroy (a2), Maureen N. Marks (a2), Kathryn A. Siddle (a2), Nicole Guedeney (a3), Antonia Bifulco (a4), Paul Asten (a5), Barbara Figueiredo (a6), Laura L. Gorman (a7), Simona Bellini (a8), Elisabeth Glatigny-Dallay (a9), Sandra Hayes (a10), Claudia M. Klier (a11), Martin H. Kammerer (a12), Carol A. Henshaw (a13) and TCS–PND Group...
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