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Congenital anomalies and early functional impairments in a prospective birth cohort: Risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in adulthood

  • John L. Waddington (a1), Alan S. Brown (a2), Abbie Lane (a3), Catherine A. Schaefer (a4), Raymond R. Goetz (a5), Michaeline Bresnahan (a2) and Ezra S. Susser (a2)...

Abstract

Background

Adversities operating over intrauterine life have been associated with risk of schizophrenia, but the biology of resultant developmental perturbation is poorly understood.

Aims

To examine the relationship of congenital anomalies and related functional impairments in infancy to risk of schizophrenia.

Method

Using the Congenital Anomalies data-set from the Prenatal Determinants of Schizophrenia birth cohort, congenital anomalies and related functional impairments were categorised and related to subsequent risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.

Results

The presence of any hypothesis-based congenital anomaly or related functional impairment was associated with a doubling of risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. In contrast, having any other congenital anomaly or related functional impairment was not associated with risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.

Conclusions

These findings constitute evidence for early events, which may result from both genetic predisposition and environmental insults, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr John L. Waddington, Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2, Ireland. Email: jwadding@rcsi.ie

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None. Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes

References

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Congenital anomalies and early functional impairments in a prospective birth cohort: Risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in adulthood

  • John L. Waddington (a1), Alan S. Brown (a2), Abbie Lane (a3), Catherine A. Schaefer (a4), Raymond R. Goetz (a5), Michaeline Bresnahan (a2) and Ezra S. Susser (a2)...
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