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Cognitive style in bipolar disorder

  • Lisa Jones (a1), Jan Scott (a2), Sayeed Haque (a3), Katherine Gordon-Smith (a4), Jessica Heron (a3), Sian Caesar (a3), Caroline Cooper (a3), Liz Forty (a4), Sally Hyde (a5), Louisa Lyon (a5), Jayne Greening (a5), Pak Sham (a6), Anne Farmer (a6), Peter McGuffin (a6), Ian Jones (a4) and Nick Craddock (a7)...

Abstract

Background

Abnormalities of cognitive style in bipolar disorder are of both clinical and theoretical importance.

Aims

To compare cognitive style in people with affective disorders and in healthy controls.

Method

Self-rated questionnaires were administered to 118 individuals with bipolar I disorder, 265 with unipolar major recurrent depression and 268 healthy controls. Those with affective disorder were also interviewed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry and case notes were reviewed.

Results

Those with bipolar disorder and those with unipolar depression demonstrated different patterns of cognitive style from controls; negative self-esteem best discriminated between those with affective disorders and controls; measures of cognitive style were substantially affected by current levels of depressive symptomatology; patterns of cognitive style were similar in bipolar and unipolar disorder when current mental state was taken into account.

Conclusions

Those with affective disorder significantly differed from controls on measures of cognitive style but there were no differences between unipolar and bipolar disorders when current mental state was taken into account.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Lisa Jones, Department of Psychiatry, Division of Neuroscience, University of Birmingham, Queen Elizabeth Psychiatric Hospital, Birmingham B15 2QZ, UK. Tel: +44 121 678 2362; fax: +44 121 678 2351; e-mail: l.a.jones@bham.ac.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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Cognitive style in bipolar disorder

  • Lisa Jones (a1), Jan Scott (a2), Sayeed Haque (a3), Katherine Gordon-Smith (a4), Jessica Heron (a3), Sian Caesar (a3), Caroline Cooper (a3), Liz Forty (a4), Sally Hyde (a5), Louisa Lyon (a5), Jayne Greening (a5), Pak Sham (a6), Anne Farmer (a6), Peter McGuffin (a6), Ian Jones (a4) and Nick Craddock (a7)...
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