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Subjective ratings of emotional health as a risk factor for major depression in a community sample

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2018

Rani A. Hoff*
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
Martha Livingston Bruce
Affiliation:
Cornell University Medical College, Department of Psychiatry
Stanislav V. Kasl
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
Selby C. Jacobs
Affiliation:
Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
*
Dr Rani A. Hoff, NEPEC, Building 8, West Haven VA Medical Center, 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516, USA

Abstract

Background

Although subjective ratings of health have been shown to be accurate predictors of physical health outcomes, there is little research on the association between subjective emotional health (SEH) and psychiatric outcomes.

Method

This paper utilises data from the Epidemiologic Catchment Area study to explore the relationship between baseline SEH and the risk for major depression in the next year. Both recurrent and incident episodes of depression are outcomes of interest.

Results

The age- and gender-adjusted relationship between SEH and depression is quite significant, and remains so after adjusting for other factors associated with major depression. The more positive the SEH rating, the lower the risk of an episode of depression in the next year.

Conclusions

Some possible explanations for this association are explored, including possible confounders that were not accounted for and the possibility that SEH ratings pose an independent risk for major depression.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

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