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Genetic Implications in Assortative Mating of Affective Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2018

Enrico Smeraldi*
Affiliation:
Institute of Clinical Psychiatry; Milan University School of Medicine, via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy
Fiammetta Negri
Affiliation:
Institute of Clinical Psychiatry; Milan University School of Medicine, via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy
Anna Maria Melica
Affiliation:
Institute of Clinical Psychiatry; Milan University School of Medicine, via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy
Rosanna Zuliani
Affiliation:
Institute of Clinical Psychiatry; Milan University School of Medicine, via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy
Mariangela Gasperini
Affiliation:
Institute of Clinical Psychiatry; Milan University School of Medicine, via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy
F. Macciardi
Affiliation:
Institute of Clinical Psychiatry; Milan University School of Medicine, via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milan, Italy
*
Correspondence.

Summary

Psychiatric disorders in a sample of spouses of probands with recurrent Primary Affective Disorders (PAD) and in their first degree relatives were evaluated and compared with those in the spouses of control subjects without psychiatric illnesses. No differences were found in the risk for PAD, but spouses of PAD patients and their respective first degree relatives manifested a greater incidence of affective spectrum disorders.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1981 

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