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Radio Microlensing: Past, Present & Near Future

  • L. V. E. Koopmans (a1) (a2) (a3), A. G. de Bruyn (a2) (a4), C. D. Fassnacht (a5), J. Wambsganss (a6) and R. D. Blandford (a1)...

Abstract

Strongly correlated non-intrinsic variability between 5 and 8.5 GHz has been observed in one of the lensed images of the gravitational lens B1600+434. These non-intrinsic (i.e. ‘external’) variations are interpreted as radio-micro-lensing of relativistic μas-scale jet components in the source at a redshift of z=1.59 by massive compact objects in the halo of the edge-on disk lens galaxy at z=0.41. We shortly summarize these observations and discuss several new observational and theoretical programs to investigate this new phenomenon in more detail.

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References

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Koopmans, L. V. E & de Bruyn, A. G., 2000, A&A, 358, 793.
Koopmans, L. V. E., de Bruyn, A. G., Wambsganss, J., & Fassnacht, C. D., 2000a, to appear in Microlensing 2000: A New Era of Microlensing Astrophysics, eds Menzies, J. W. & Sackett, P. D., ASP Conference Series.
Koopmans, L. V. E., de Bruyn, A. G., Wambsganss, J., Fassnacht, C. D. & Blandford, R. D., 2000b, to appear in “Cosmological Physics with Gravitational Lensing”, Kneib, J.-P., Mellier, Y., Moniez, M. & Tran Thanh, Van J. eds, Recontres de Moriond XX.

Radio Microlensing: Past, Present & Near Future

  • L. V. E. Koopmans (a1) (a2) (a3), A. G. de Bruyn (a2) (a4), C. D. Fassnacht (a5), J. Wambsganss (a6) and R. D. Blandford (a1)...

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