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General Factor of Personality Questionnaire (GFPQ): Only one Factor to Understand Personality?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2013

Salvador Amigó
Affiliation:
Universitat de València (Spain)
Antonio Caselles
Affiliation:
Universitat de València (Spain)
Joan C. Micó
Affiliation:
Universitat Politècnica de Valéncia (Spain)
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This study proposes a psychometric approach to assess the General Factor of Personality (GFP) to explain the whole personality. This approach defends the existence of one basic factor that represents the overall personality. The General Factor of Personality Questionnaire (GFPQ) is presented to measure the basic, combined trait of the complete personality. The questionnaire includes 20 items and is constituted by two scales with 10 items each one: the Extraversion Scale (ES) and the Introversion Scale (IS). The GFPQ shows adequate internal consistency and construct validity, while the relationships with the personality factors of other models and with psychopathology are as expected. It correlates positively and significantly with Extraversion (E) and Psychoticism (P), and negatively with Neuroticism (N) of Eysenck's EPQ (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire); it correlates positively and significantly with the Sensation Seeking Scaled (SSS) of Zuckerman, and is inside the expected direction with Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), which represent the approach and avoidance trends of behavior, respectively. It not only relates negatively with the personality disorders of the anxiety spectrum, but also with the emotional disorders in relation to anxiety and depression, and it relates positively with the antisocial personality disorder.

El presente estudio propone una aproximación psicométrica a la evaluación del Factor General de Personalidad (FGP) para explicar la personalidad completa. Esta aproximación defiende la existencia de un factor básico que representa la personalidad general. El Cuestionario del Factor General de Personalidad (CFGP) se presenta como herramienta para medir este rasgo básico combinado de la personalidad global. El cuestionario incluye 20 ítems y está constituido por dos escalas con 10 ítems cada una: la Escala de Extraversión (EE) y la Escala de Introversión (EI). El CFGP muestra una consistencia interna adecuada y validez de constructo, mientras que sus relaciones con los factores de personalidad de otros modelos y con la psicopatología son las que se esperan. Correlaciona positiva y significativamente con Extraversión (E) y con Psicoticismo (P) y negativamente con Neuroticismo (N) del Cuestionario de Personalidad de Eysenck (CPE); correlaciona positiva y significativamente con la Escala de Búsqueda de Sensaciones (EBS) de Zuckerman y se encuentra en la dirección esperada en su relación con Sensibilización al Refuerzo (SR) y Sensibilización al Castigo (SC) del Cuestionario de Sensibilización al Castigo y Sensibilización al Refuerzo (CSCSR), los cuales representan respectivamente las tendencias conductuales de aproximación y evitación. No solo se relaciona negativamente con los trastornos de personalidad del espectro de ansiedad sino también con los trastornos emocionales que tienen relación con la ansiedad y la depresión y, se relaciona positivamente con el trastorno antisocial de la personalidad.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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