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Women Asylum Seekers and Refugees: Opportunities, Constraints and the Role of Agency

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2008

Lisa Hunt*
Affiliation:
Salford Housing and Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU), School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford E-mail: l.hunt@salford.ac.uk

Abstract

This article is based on the findings of research undertaken towards a doctoral thesis funded by the University of Leeds. The research focuses upon the actions and experiences of women asylum seekers and refugees living in West Yorkshire. While acknowledging that the context in which women find themselves can present a number of barriers, this paper looks at their actions and practices at the individual and collective levels. It illustrates that some women are able to draw on the resources available, and are engaged in activities that not only assist their own settlement in the host society but also assist the development of support structures for future arrivals of asylum seekers and refugees.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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