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Freedom to be a Child: Commercial Pressures on Children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2008

David Piachaud*
Affiliation:
London School of Economics, London E-mail: d.piachaud@lsc.ac.uk

Abstract

Children's lives have been transformed over the past century. Family incomes have increased, children lead lives that are more solitary, attitudes to childhood have changed, new products have been developed and commercial pressures on children have increased. The importance of these commercial pressures is analysed. Do children understand advertising? How is child poverty affected? How does increased materialism affect psychological well-being? The issues raised for public policy are discussed in terms of children's freedom.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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