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Decriminalising Queer Sexualities in India: A Multiple Streams Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2008

Alankaar Sharma*
Affiliation:
School of Social Work, University of Minnesota E-mail: sharm087@umn.edu

Abstract

Against a historical and contemporary backdrop of queer sexualities in India, this paper discusses certain approaches towards agenda setting using the Multiple Streams policy framework (Kingdon, 1984; Zahariadis, 1999) to change Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalises non-normative sexual activities. The paper attempts to map the path of legal challenge to Section 377 and focus on the process of agenda setting as a crucial step in the campaign towards social policy change. It then examines some of the current trends and developments that, if used efficaciously through agenda setting, may result in a unique policy window opportunity.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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