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On redundancy resolution of the human thumb, index and middle fingers in cooperative object translation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2016

Felix Orlando Maria Joseph
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Kanpur 208016, Kanpur, India Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Roorkee 247667, Roorkee India
Laxmidhar Behera
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Kanpur 208016, Kanpur, India
Tomoya Tamei
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Information Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Nara 630-0192, Japan
Tomohiro Shibata
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering Human and Social Intelligence Systems Lab, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka Prefecture 804-0015, Fukuoka, Japan
Ashish Dutta
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kanpur 208016, Kanpur, India
Anupam Saxena
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kanpur 208016, Kanpur, India
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

Redundancy in motion, and synergy in neuromuscular coordination provides significant versatility to the human fingers while performing coordinated grasping and manipulation tasks in several ways. This paper explores how humans may resolve the redundancy in their thumb, index and middle fingers when these digits flex to cooperatively translate a small object toward the palm. It is observed that humans actively employ a secondary subtask of maximizing instantaneous manipulability that helps determine all intermediate finger configurations when performing the primary subtask of following a tip trajectory. This behavior is accurately captured by an inverse kinematic model based on a redundancy parameter. The joint angles get determined unambiguously though the redundancy parameter is shown to depend on the instantaneous finger configurations and also, to attain negative values. Further, this parameter is noted to vary significantly across subjects performing the same kinematic task. The findings, that are based on the experimental finger motion data garnered from 12 subjects, are reckoned to be of significant importance, especially in reference to the challenges in design and control of finger exoskeletons for cooperative manipulation.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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