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Hybrid control for SLIP-based robots running on unknown rough terrain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 January 2014

Bin Han
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, People's Republic of China
Xin Luo
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, People's Republic of China
Qingyu Liu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, People's Republic of China
Bo Zhou
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, People's Republic of China
Xuedong Chen
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, People's Republic of China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

Rapid and efficient dynamic stability control has been one of the important motivations in legged robot research, especially for legged robots running at high speed and/or on rough terrain. This paper presents a feasible control strategy, named Hybrid Feedback Control (HFC), for running systems based on the spring-loaded inverted pendulum principle (SLIP). The HFC strategy, which comprises two modules (i.e., touchdown angle control and energy compensation), predicts and regulates touchdown angle of the current cycle and need-to-complement energy input of the next cycle through hybrid feedback of flying apex state. This strategy can significantly reduce the computational complexity and enable the system to quickly converge to its control target, meeting the requirements of real-time control. Simulation experiments on various terrains were conducted to verify the adaptability of our HFC strategy. Results of these simulation experiments show that the approach herein can realize the periodical stability control of SLIP systems on different terrain conditions quickly and effectively.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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