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Feature map management for mobile robots in dynamic environments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2009

Se-Jin Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784, Korea
Byung-Jae Park
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784, Korea
Jong-Hwan Lim
Affiliation:
Department of Mechatronics, Cheju National University, #1 Ara-dong, Jeju 690-756, Korea
Dong-Woo Cho
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784, Korea Department of Integrative Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Pohang 790-784, Korea
Corresponding

Summary

This paper presents a new approach to the management of the environmental map for mobile robots in dynamic environments. The environmental map is built of primitive features, such as lines, points, and even circles, extracted from ambiguous data captured by the robot's sonar sensor ring. The feature map must be managed because the indoor surroundings where mobile robots operate are continuously changing due to nonstationary objects, such as wastebaskets, tables, and people. The features are processed by trimming, division, or removal, depending on the dynamic circumstances. All processing refers to the occupancy probabilities of grid squares generated for the map features. The occupancy probabilities of the squares are updated using the Bayesian updating model with the sonar sensor data. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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