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Determining maximum load-carrying capacity of robots using adaptive robust neural controller

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 March 2010


M. H. Korayem
Affiliation:
Robotic Research Laboratory, College of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
A. Alamdari
Affiliation:
Robotic Research Laboratory, College of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
R. Haghighi
Affiliation:
Robotic Research Laboratory, College of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
A. H. Korayem
Affiliation:
Robotic Research Laboratory, College of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

In this paper, the combination of neural network (NN), proportional derivative (PD), and robust controller are used for determining the maximum load-carrying capacity (MLCC) of articulated robots, subject to both actuator and end-effector deflection constraints. The proposed technique is then applied to articulated robots, and MLCC is obtained for a given trajectory. In the practical simulations, it's impossible to determine the parameters of robot model exactly, so the trajectory tracking performance of the proportional integral derivative (PID) and computed torque methods significantly decrease. The PD control of robot has major problem, it cannot guarantee zero steady state error. For this reason, the NN controller with PD and robust controller are used. The multilayer neural network is also used to compensate gravity and friction effects. By using Lyapunov Direct Method it is shown that the stability of closed loop system would be guaranteed, if the weights of multilayer had certain learning rules. Standard back propagation algorithm is used as a learning algorithm to update the connection weights of the NN controller. The simulation results of the proposed adaptive robust neural network (ARNN) controller are compred with sliding mode and feedback linearization methods for flexible joint robot, and compared with open loop controller for 3D industrial robot. The obtained results assured the robustness and improvement in MLCC in the presence of uncertainties in dynamic model of the robot arm and external disturbances. In fact, adaptive robust NN controller suppresses disturbances accurately and achieves very small errors between commanded and actual trajectories.


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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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