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The use of antithrombotic drugs for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 November 2008

Richard J Davenport
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
Martin S Dennis
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

Abstract

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Type
Clinical geriatrics
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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References

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