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MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN PHILOSOPHY EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2008

ALDO ANTONELLI*
Affiliation:
University of California
ALASDAIR URQUHART*
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
RICHARD ZACH*
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
*
*DEPARTMENT OF LOGIC AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 3151 SOCIAL SCIENCE PLAZA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE, CA 92697-5100, USA E-mail: aldo@uci.edu
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 10 KING'S COLLEGE ROAD UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO TORONTO, ONTARIO M5S 3G4, CANADA E-mail: Urquhart@cs.toronto.edu
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 10 KING'S COLLEGE ROAD UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO TORONTO, ONTARIO M5S 3G4, CANADA E-mail: Urquhart@cs.toronto.edu

Extract

Mathematics and philosophy have historically enjoyed a mutually beneficial and productive relationship, as a brief review of the work of mathematician–philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Bolzano, Dedekind, Frege, Brouwer, Hilbert, Gödel, and Weyl easily confirms. In the last century, it was especially mathematical logic and research in the foundations of mathematics which, to a significant extent, have been driven by philosophical motivations and carried out by technically minded philosophers. Mathematical logic continues to play an important role in contemporary philosophy, and mathematically trained philosophers continue to contribute to the literature in logic. For instance, modal logics were first investigated by philosophers and now have important applications in computer science and mathematical linguistics.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Association for Symbolic Logic 2008

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