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China in the conception of international society: the English School's engagements with China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 July 2010

Abstract

Since Martin Wight's famous LSE lectures in the late 1950s, the English School scholars have brought China into the conception of international society. As the English School scholars have been ‘inventing’ an international society, China's status in the conception, or conceptions of international society has also been invented and reinvented. The Chinese case vividly demonstrates how a non-European (or non-Western) country, as one of ‘the others’, has been dealt with and brought into the conceptualisation of international society by the English School. China's status in the conception of international society, to a great extent, has been invented by some of the English School scholars with Eurocentric bias.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British International Studies Association 2010

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References

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34 Lass Francis Lawrence Oppenhaim's International Law (1905) discussed the emergence of the standard of civilisation, and Georg Schwarzenberger published an article on the standard of civilisation in international law in 1955. And Hedley Bull touched on that theme and used the term ‘standard of “civilization”’ in his proposal for the British Committee in 1978. Bull, Hedley, ‘A Proposal for a Study’ (October 1978), reprinted in Brunello Vigezzi, The British Committee on the Theory of International Politics (1954–1985): The Rediscovery of History, pp. 425428Google Scholar .

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99 Ibid., p. 10.

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106 Adam Roberts, ‘The Evolution of International Relations’, Notes for lecture at Royal College of Defence Studies (21 January 2008), p. 21.

107 Ibid.

108 Andrew Hurrell, ‘Hegemony, Liberalism and Global Order: What space for would-be great powers?’; Rosemary Foot, ‘Chinese Strategies in a US-hegemonic Global Order: Accommodating and hedging’.

109 Wheeler, Nicholas J., ‘Introduction: The Political and Moral Limits of Western Military Intervention to Protect Civilians in Danger’, in McInnes, Colin and Wheeler, Nicholas J. (eds), Dimensions of Western Military Intervention (London: Frank Cass Publishers, 2002), p. 4Google Scholar .

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113 Yizhou, Wang, Xifang Guoji Guanxi Xue: Lilun Yu Lishi (Western International Politics: History and Theory) (Shanghai: Shanghai People's Press, 1998), pp. 378379Google Scholar ; Zhirui, Chen, Guiyin, Zhou and Bin, Shi (eds), Kaifang De Guoji Shehui: Guoji Guanxi Yanjiu Zhong De Yingguo Xuepai (Open International Society: The English School in IR Studies), p. 21, pp. 6970Google Scholar ; Cungang, Wang, ‘Learn From and Be Critical of the English School: Some Thoughts on Working on and Learning from the English School’, Europe Studies, 4 (2005), pp. 4852Google Scholar .

114 Some of the Chinese IR scholars have been taking great efforts in this regards. Tingyang, Zhao, Tianxia Tixi: Shijie Zhidu Zhexue Daolun (The Tianxia System: An Introduction to the Philosophy for the World Institutions) (Nanjing: Jiangsu Education Press, 2005)Google Scholar ; Tingyang, Zhao, ‘Rethinking Empire from a Chinese Concept “All-under Heaven” (Tian-xia)’, Social Identities 12:1 (2006), pp. 2941Google Scholar ; Yaqing, Qin, ‘Core Problematic of International Relations Theory and the Construction of a Chinese School’, Social Sciences in China, 3 (2005), pp. 165176Google Scholar ; Callahan, William A., ‘Chinese Visions of World Order: Post-hegemonic or a New Hegemony’, International Studies Review, 10 (2008), pp. 749761CrossRefGoogle Scholar .

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