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Knowledge and skills attractive for the employers of the organic sector: A survey across Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2019


Teresa Briz
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, CEIGRAM. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Avda. Puerta de Hierro, 2 28040 Madrid, Spain
Peter von Fragstein und Niemsdorff
Affiliation:
Department of Organic Vegetable Production, University of Kassel, Nordbahnhofstr. 1a, D37213 Witzenhausen, Germany
Emanuele Radicetti
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences (DAFNE), University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis, snc. 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Roberto Moscetti
Affiliation:
Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis, snc. 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Eeva Uusitalo
Affiliation:
Ruralia Institute, University of Helsinki, Lönnrotinkatu 7 50100 Mikkeli, Finland
Sari Iivonen
Affiliation:
Finnish Organic Research Institute, Lönnrotinkatu 7, 50100 Mikkeli, Finland
Ritva Mynttinen
Affiliation:
Ruralia Institute, University of Helsinki, Lönnrotinkatu 7 50100 Mikkeli, Finland
Jan Moudry
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Studentská 1668, 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
Jan Moudry
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Studentská 1668, 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
Petr Konvalina
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Studentská 1668, 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
Marek Kopecky
Affiliation:
Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Studentská 1668, 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
Dominika Średnicka-Tober
Affiliation:
Department of Functional and Organic Food, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Renata Kazimierczak
Affiliation:
Department of Functional and Organic Food, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Liina Talgre
Affiliation:
Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51006, Tartu, Estonia
Darja Matt
Affiliation:
Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51006, Tartu, Estonia
Eve Veromann
Affiliation:
Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 1, 51006, Tartu, Estonia
Roberto Mancinelli
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences (DAFNE), University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis, snc. 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Ewa Rembiałkowska
Affiliation:
Department of Functional and Organic Food, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

In all countries, the organic sector of the agricultural industry is increasing, with Europe traditionally leading this trend. A survey of different stakeholders (employers) was carried out in 2015 in seven European countries to evaluate the employment market for the organic agricultural industry in Europe. Results indicate the willingness to employ qualified graduates. From the employers' perspective, the most desirable knowledge skills among the graduates of organic agricultural studies include plant production, food quality and plant protection. Further, the study revealed the work skills most desired by the employers are practical expertise, teamwork and problem-solving, and the most important method of learning is cooperation with enterprises (internships/training) in the organic agricultural sector.


Type
Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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Footnotes

*

The study is part of a European project ‘Innovative Education towards the Needs of the Organic Sector’ funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union.


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