Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-ptlz9 Total loading time: 0.616 Render date: 2023-02-05T04:48:08.934Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

A self-tracking study of international students in France: Exploring opportunities for language and cultural learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2019

Nicolas Guichon*
Affiliation:
Université Lumière Lyon2 – Laboratoire ICAR, France (nicolas.guichon@univ-lyon2.fr)

Abstract

This exploratory study focuses on international students’ usage of digital tools in order to understand what role such tools play in the transition to their new academic environments and what learning opportunities they provide. Not only do digital tools accompany international students’ social, cultural, and linguistic transitions as they move to France to further their language competence, but their usage also reveals part of the social and semiotic adjustments they have to make in the process. Sixteen international students who volunteered for the study were given a smartphone application with which they could track learning opportunities by taking pictures and writing textual commentaries. The data, collected over a period of five weeks, thus include the resulting entries these participants shared in their mobile multimodal diaries with the researchers, as well as an end-of-project debriefing that was conducted to shed further light on the international students’ digital habits and their attitudes towards self-tracking. This study indicates that digital tools can play an important and pervasive role in facilitating international students’ linguistic development and their dealings with everyday life abroad. It also confirms that self-tracking apps can be instrumental in enhancing students’ awareness of learning opportunities outside the classroom.

Type
Regular papers
Information
ReCALL , Volume 31 , Issue 3 , September 2019 , pp. 276 - 292
Copyright
© European Association for Computer Assisted Language Learning 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Andrade, M. S. (2006) International students in English-speaking universities: Adjustment factors. Journal of Research in International Education, 5(2): 131154. https://doi.org/10.1177/1475240906065589CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Arnseth, H. C. & Silseth, K. (2013) Tracing learning and identity across sites: Tensions, connections and transformations in and between everyday and institutional practices. In Erstad, O. & Sefton-Green, J. (eds.), Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2338.Google Scholar
Beale, R. (2007) How to enhance the experience without interfering with it? In Sharples, M. (ed.), Big issues in mobile learning: Report of a workshop by the Kaleidoscope Network of Excellence Mobile Learning Initiative. Nottingham: University of Nottingham, Learning Sciences Research Institute, 1014.Google Scholar
Benson, P., Barkhuizen, G., Bodycott, P. & Brown, J. (2012) Study abroad and the development of second language identities. Applied Linguistics Review, 3(1): 173193. https://doi.org/10.1515/applirev-2012-0008CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Block, D. (2007) The rise of identity in SLA research, Post Firth and Wagner (1997). Modern Language Journal, 91(5): 863876. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.15404781.2007.00674.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chan, N. N., Walker, C. & Gleaves, A. (2015) An exploration of students’ lived experiences of using smartphones in diverse learning contexts using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Computers & Education, 82: 96106. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.11.001CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Comas-Quinn, A., Mardomingo, R. & Valentine, C. (2009) Mobile blogs in language learning: Making the most of informal and situated learning opportunities. ReCALL, 21(1): 96112. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344009000032CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crompton, H., Burke, D. & Gregory, K. H. (2017) The use of mobile learning in PK-12 education: A systematic review. Computers & Education, 110: 5163. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2017.03.013CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drotner, K. (2013) Processual methodologies and digital forms of learning. In Erstad, O. & Sefton-Green, J. (eds.), Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 3956.Google Scholar
Dudeney, G., Hockly, N. & Pegrum, M. (2014) Digital literacies. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Eshach, H. (2007) Bridging in-school and out-of-school learning: Formal, non-formal, and informal education. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(2): 171190. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-006-9027-1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilje, Ø. & Erstad, O. (2014) Tracing learning across contexts: Methodological challenges and ethical considerations. In Gudmundsdottir, G. B. & Vasbø, K. B. (eds.), Methodological challenges when exploring digital learning spaces in education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 135149.Google Scholar
Godwin-Jones, R. (2016) Integrating technology into study abroad. Language Learning & Technology, 20(1): 120. https://doi.org/10125/44439Google Scholar
Green, B. (2012) Literacy, place and the digital world. Language and Education, 26(4): 377382. https://doi.org/10.1080/09500782.2012.691518CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guichon, N. (2015) Quelle transition numérique pour les étudiants internationaux? Alsic, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.4000/alsic.2793CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guichon, N. & Koné, S. (2015) Etudiants internationaux et technologies numériques nomades: vers un contrat didactique renégocié. La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie, 41(3): 121. https://doi.org/10.21432/T2G03GGoogle Scholar
Highfield, T. & Leaver, T. (2016) Instagrammatics and digital methods: Studying visual social media, from selfies and GIFs to memes and emoji. Communication Research and Practice, 2(1): 4762. https://doi.org/10.1080/22041451.2016.1155332CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Julien, H., Given, L. M. & Opryshko, A. (2013) Photovoice: A promising method for studies of individuals’ information practices. Library & Information Science Research, 35(4): 257263. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2013.04.004CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kinginger, C. (2013) Identity and language learning in study abroad. Foreign Language Annals, 46(3): 339358. https://doi.org/10.1111/flan.12037CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kress, G. (2013) Recognizing learning: A perspective from a social semiotic theory of multimodality. In de Saint-Georges, I. & Weber, J.-J. (eds.), Multilingualism and multimodality: Current challenges for educational studies. London: Sense Publishers, 119140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kukulska-Hulme, A., Lee, H. & Norris, L. (2017) Mobile learning revolution: Implications for language pedagogy. In Chapelle, C. A. & Sauro, S. (eds.), The handbook of technology and second language teaching and learning. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 217233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lahire, B. (2012) Monde pluriel: Penser l’unité des sciences sociales. Paris: Le Seuil.Google Scholar
Lankshear, C. & Knobel, M. (2011) New literacies: Everyday practices and social learning (3rd ed.). New York: Open University Press.Google Scholar
Leander, K. M., Phillips, N. C. & Headrick Taylor, K. (2010) The changing social spaces of learning: Mapping new mobilities. Review of Research in Education, 34: 329394.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lehto, X. Y., Cai, L. A., Fu, X. & Chen, Y. (2014) Intercultural interactions outside the classroom: Narratives on a US campus. Journal of College Student Development, 55(8): 837853. https://doi.org/10.1353/csd.2014.0083CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lemke, J. L. (2013) Thinking about feeling: Affect across literacies and lives. In Erstad, O. & Sefton-Green, J. (eds.), Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 5769.Google Scholar
Marchandise, S. (2014) Le Facebook des étudiants marocains. Territoire relationnel et territoire des possibles. Revue Européenne des Migrations Internationales, 30(3–4): 3148. https://doi.org/10.4000/remi.7065CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peters, M. & Frankoff, M. (2014) New literacy practices and plagiarism: A study of strategies for digital scrapbooking. In Pettes Guikema, J. & Williams, L. (eds.), Digital literacies in foreign and second language education. San Marcos: CALICO, 245264.Google Scholar
Pham, L. & Saltmarsh, D. (2013) International students’ identities in a globalized world: Narratives from Vietnam. Journal of Research in International Education, 12(2): 129141. https://doi.org/10.1177/1475240913481171CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ranta, L. & Meckelborg, A. (2013) How much exposure to English do international graduate students really get? Measuring language use in a naturalistic setting. The Canadian Modern Language Review, 69(1): 133. https://doi.org/10.3138/cmlr.987CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sefton-Green, J. & Erstad, O. (2013) Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age. In Sefton-Green, J. & Erstad, O. (eds.), Identity, community, and learning lives in the digital age. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 119.Google Scholar
Shao, Y. & Crook, C. (2015) The potential of a mobile group blog to support cultural learning among overseas students. Journal of Studies in International Education, 19(5): 399422. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1028315315574101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sharples, M., Arnedillo-Sánchez, I., Milrad, M. & Vavoula, G. (2009) Mobile learning: Small devices, big issues. In Balacheff, N., Ludvigsen, S., de Jong, T., Lazonder, A., and Barnes, S. (eds.), Technology-enhanced learning: Principles and products. Dordrecht: Springer-Verlag, 223251. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9827-7_14Google Scholar
Tabuenca, B., Kalz, M., Drachsler, H. & Specht, M. (2015) Time will tell: The role of mobile learning analytics in self-regulated learning. Computers & Education, 89: 5374. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.08.004CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tapscott, D. (2009) Grown up digital: How the net generation is changing your world. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Walker, M., Whyatt, D., Pooley, C., Davies, G., Coulton, P. & Bamford, W. (2009) Talk, technologies and teenagers: Understanding the school journey using a mixed-methods approach. Children’s Geographies, 7(2): 107122. https://doi.org/10.1080/14733280902798829CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, C. & Burris, M. A. (1997) Photovoice: Concept, methodology, and use for participatory needs assessment. Health Education & Behavior, 24(3): 369387. https://doi.org/10.1177/109019819702400309CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A self-tracking study of international students in France: Exploring opportunities for language and cultural learning
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

A self-tracking study of international students in France: Exploring opportunities for language and cultural learning
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

A self-tracking study of international students in France: Exploring opportunities for language and cultural learning
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *