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A Direct Estimate of the Initial Concentration of 14C in the Mountain Aquifer of Israel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Israel Carmi*
Affiliation:
Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
Joel Kronfeld
Affiliation:
Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
Yoseph Yechieli
Affiliation:
Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkei Israel St, Jerusalem 95501, Israel
Elisabetta Boaretto
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
Miryam Bar-Matthews
Affiliation:
Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkei Israel St, Jerusalem 95501, Israel
Avner Ayalon
Affiliation:
Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkei Israel St, Jerusalem 95501, Israel
*
Corresponding author. Email: carmiisr@post.tau.ac.il.
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Abstract

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Five radiocarbon analyses were performed on 5 different sources within Soreq Cave, which was used as a model for the Judea Group Aquifer of Israel (pMCq0). The transit time of rainwater through the roof of the cave to sources within it had been determined with tritium. From this information, the year of deposition of rain on the roof of the cave, which later appeared in one of the sources, was estimated and the atmospheric 14C concentration at that time was ascertained (pMCa0). The parameter Q = pMCq0 / pMCa0 was found to be Q = 0.60 ± 0.04. This makes it possible to calculate the age of water in any well in the Judea Group Aquifer of Israel by measuring its 14C concentration (pMCqt) by use of the decay equation and applying Q.

Type
Part II
Copyright
Copyright © The Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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