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Differentiating Bone Osteonal Turnover Rates By Density Fractionation; Validation Using the Bomb 14C Atmospheric Pulse

  • Ji Young Shin (a1) (a2), Tamsin O'Connell (a1), Stuart Black (a3) and Robert Hedges (a1)

Abstract

The density (BSG) of bone increases, at the osteon scale, during lifetime aging within the bone. In addition, post-mortem diagenetic change due to microbial attack produces denser bioapatite. Thus, fractionation of finely powdered bone on the basis of density should not only enable younger and older populations of osteons to be separated but also make it possible to separate out a less diagenetically altered component. We show that the density fractionation method can be used as a tool to investigate the isotopic history within an individual's lifetime, both in recent and archaeological contexts, and we use the bomb 14C atmospheric pulse for validating the method.

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References

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