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Carbon Isotopic Composition of Tree Rings as A Tool for Biomonitoring CO2 Level

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Sławomira Pawełczyk
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics, Radiocarbon Laboratory, Silesian University of Technology, Krzywoustego 2, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Corresponding
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Abstract

Carbon isotopes are widely used as indicators in the study of atmospheric CO2 variability in space and time. Preliminary results are part of a project investigating 13C and 14C concentration changes during the last 150 yr in Poland, both in industrial and ecologically clean regions, using annual tree rings (Pinus sylvestris, Populus nigra). The results describe the local Suess effect recorded in the industrial Kraków and Upper Silesia regions compared to changes of background radiocarbon concentration caused by global human activity in a “clean region,” Augustów Wilderness. The δ13C record also shows the influence of the local Suess effect.

Type
Part II
Copyright
Copyright © The Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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