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Patterns and implications of Plant-soil δ 13C and δ 15N values in African savanna ecosystems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Lixin Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, 291 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA
Paolo D'Odorico
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, 291 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
Lydia Ries
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, 291 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, 3011 Bren Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, USA
Stephen A. Macko
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, 291 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Southern African savannas are mixed plant communities where C3 trees co-exist with C4 grasses. Here foliar δ 15N and δ 13C were used as indicators of nitrogen uptake and of water use efficiency to investigate the effect of the rainfall regime on the use of nitrogen and water by herbaceous and woody plants in both dry and wet seasons. Foliar δ 15N increased as aridity rose for both C3 and C4 plants for both seasons, although the magnitude of the increase was different for C3 and C4 plants and for two seasons. Soil δ 15N also significantly increased with aridity. Foliar δ 13C increased with aridity for C3 plants in the wet season but not in the dry season, whereas in C4 plants the relationship was more complex and non-linear. The consistently higher foliar δ 15N for C3 plants suggests that C4 plants may be a superior competitor for nitrogen. The different foliar δ 13C relationships with rainfall may indicate that the C3 plants have an advantage when competing for water resources. The differences in water and nitrogen use likely collectively contribute to the tree–grass coexistence in savannas. Such differences facilitate interpretations of palaeo-vegetation composition variations and help predictions of vegetation composition changes under future climatic scenarios.

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Original Articles
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University of Washington

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