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Diverse Nonmarine Biota from the Whidbey Formation (Sangamonian) at Point Wilson, Washington

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Paul F. Karrow
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences and Quaternary Sciences Institute, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1
Adolph Ceska
Affiliation:
Royal British Columbia Museum, 675 Belleville Street, Victoria, Britich Columbia, Canada V8V 1X4
Richard J. Hebda
Affiliation:
Royal British Columbia Museum, 675 Belleville Street, Victoria, Britich Columbia, Canada V8V 1X4
Barry B. Miller
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242
Kevin L. Seymour
Affiliation:
Department of Vertebrate Paleontology, Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen's Park, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2C6
Alison J. Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242

Abstract

Previously undescribed plant and animal fossils from the Whidbey Formation represent two environments. An upper sand unit contains predominantly terrestrial molluscs (4 taxa), insects, and a vole (cf. Phenacomys), whereas a lower clay unit contains ostracodes (9 taxa), freshwater molluscs (6 taxa), insects (9 taxa), freshwater plant seeds (6 taxa), and fish (cf. Gasterosteus : stickleback). These taxa are compatible with interglacial climatic conditions on a coastal plain environment. The inferred freshwater and terrestrial environments of the Whidbey Formation imply local tectonic subsidence of the regional since the last interglaciation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
University of Washington

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