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Cosmic Ray Intensity Waves and the North-South Anisotropy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 April 2016

R. M. Jacklyn
Affiliation:
Antarctic Division, Department of Science and Technology
M. L. Duldig
Affiliation:
Antarctic Division, Department of Science and Technology
M. A. Pomerantz
Affiliation:
Bartol Research Foundation of the Franklin Institute, University of Delaware

Extract

Waves of variation in the daily average cosmic ray intensity at the Earth’s surface were first detected in the neutron monitor record. Following the abnormal cosmic ray storm of September 1978, a sinusoidal 13.5 day periodicity was observed in the average intensity (Pomerantz and Duggal 1979), persisting for at least two solar rotations. Further observations, including underground data from the southern hemisphere, confirmed that not only were the waves isotropic but exhibited approximately a p−1 variational dependence on primary rigidity p (Duggal et al. 1981). No further evidence for this kind of wave has yet come to light. However, in the latter half of 1982 a series of 27-day waves that were apparently of a different character were detected. The evidence for their presence resulted from an analysis of the disturbed period that followed the occurrence of the large Forbush Decrease commencing 13 July 1982. It seemed at first that they could be described as anisotropic waves of the well-known interplanetary North-South asymmetry (Jacklyn and Pomerantz 1983).

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Copyright
Copyright © Astronomical Society of Australia 1984

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References

Duggal, S. P., Jacklyn, R. M., Pomerantz, M. A. and Tsao, C. H., Proc 17th Int. Cosmic Ray Conf., Paris, 10, 179 (1981).Google Scholar
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