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Urinary iodine excretion in pregnant women residing in areas with adequate iodine intake

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 October 2007

F Azizi
Affiliation:
Endocrine Research Center, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 19395-4763, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
A Aminorroya
Affiliation:
Endocrine Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
M Hedayati
Affiliation:
Endocrine Research Center, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 19395-4763, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
H Rezvanian
Affiliation:
Endocrine Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
M Amini
Affiliation:
Endocrine Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
P Mirmiran
Affiliation:
Endocrine Research Center, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 19395-4763, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Objective:

Pregnancy is accompanied by profound alterations in thyroid economy and relative iodine deficiency. The aim of this study was to evaluate urinary iodine excretion of pregnant women in cities with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study was performed on schoolchildren and pregnant women in four cities in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Urinary iodine excretion was measured for 438 schoolchildren and 403 pregnant women. In addition, in Isfahan City, thyroid volume was measured by sonography for 30 pregnant women in each trimester of pregnancy and for 90 non-pregnant women who also had urinary iodine measurement.

Results:

Median urinary iodine of schoolchildren was 31.2, 25.0, 20.2 and 19.3 μg/dl in Rasht, Isfahan, Ilam and Tehran, respectively. Corresponding values for pregnant women were 33.8, 21.2, 19.0 and 18.6μg/dl. The percentage of pregnant women with urinary iodine below 20μg/dl was 16, 45, 55 and 54, and below 10μg/dl was 1, 7, 7 and 13, in Rasht, Isfahan, Ilam and Tehran, respectively. In Isfahan, urinary iodine was significantly decreased in the third trimester of pregnancy, compared with controls. Mean thyroid volume was 7.8±3.1 ml and 7.8±2.8 ml in pregnant and non-pregnant women, respectively.

Conclusion:

Recommended values for dietary iodine through universal salt iodisation may not be adequate for pregnant women, and the specific problem of iodine and pregnancy should be considered further in the light of the latest recommendations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 2003

References

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