Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Trends in self-reported past alcoholic beverage consumption and ethanol intake from 1950 to 1995 observed in eight European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

  • K Klipstein-Grobusch (a1), N Slimani (a2), V Krogh (a3), U Keil (a4), H Boeing (a1), K Overvad (a5), A Tjønneland (a6), F Clavel-Chapelon (a7), A Thiébaut (a7), J Linseisen (a8), MB Schulze (a1), P Lagiou (a9), A Papadimitrou (a9), C Saieva (a10), F Veglia (a11), HB Bueno-de-Mesquita (a12), PHM Peeters (a13), M Kumle (a14), M Brustad (a14), C Martínez García (a15), A Barricarte (a16), G Berglund (a17), L Weinehall (a18), A Mulligan (a19), N Allen (a20), P Ferrari (a2) and E Riboli (a2)...

Abstract

Objective:

To describe the trends of self-reported past consumption of alcoholic beverages and ethanol intake from 1950 to 1995 within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

Design:

Data on consumption of beer/cider, wine and liqueur/spirits were obtained retrospectively at age 20, 30 and 40 years to calculate average consumption and ethanol intake for the time periods 1950–1975 (at age 20), 1960–1985 (at age 30) and 1970–1995 (at age 40). Regression analysis was conducted with the time period data to assess trends in past alcoholic beverage consumption and ethanol intake with time.

Setting:

The EPIC project.

Subjects:

In total, 392 064 EPIC participants (275 249 women and 116 815 men) from 21 study centres in eight European countries.

Results:

Generally, increases in beer/cider consumption were observed for most EPIC centres for 1950–1975, 1960–1985 and 1970–1995. Trends in wine consumption differed according to geographical location: downward trends with time were observed for men in southern European EPIC centres, upward trends for those in middle/northern European study centres. For women, similar but less pronounced trends were observed. Because wine consumption was the major contributor to ethanol intake for both men and women in most study centres, time trends for ethanol intake showed a similar geographical pattern to that of wine consumption.

Conclusion:

The different trends in alcoholic beverage consumption and ethanol intake suggest that information depicting lifetime history of ethanol intake should be included in analyses of the relationship between ethanol and chronic diseases, particularly in multi-centre studies such as EPIC.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Trends in self-reported past alcoholic beverage consumption and ethanol intake from 1950 to 1995 observed in eight European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Trends in self-reported past alcoholic beverage consumption and ethanol intake from 1950 to 1995 observed in eight European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Trends in self-reported past alcoholic beverage consumption and ethanol intake from 1950 to 1995 observed in eight European countries participating in the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email klipst@mail.dife.de

References

Hide All
1NRC Committee on Diet and Health. Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1989.
2Grobbee, DE, Rimm, EB, Keil, U, Renaud, S. Alcohol and the cardiovascular system. In: MacDonald, I, ed. Health Issues Related to Alcohol Consumption. Oxford: Blackwell Science, 2000.
3World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF)/American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). Food, Nutrition and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective. Washington, DC: WCRF/AICR, 1997.
4Rimm, EB, Klatsky, A, Grobbee, D, Stampfer, MJ. Review of moderate alcohol consumption and reduced risk of coronary heart disease: is the effect due to beer, wine, or spirits. Br. Med. J. 1996; 312: 731–6.
5Neve, RJ, Diederiks, JP, Knibbe, RA, Drop, MJ. Developments in drinking behavior in The Netherlands from 1958 to 1989, a cohort analysis. Addiction 1993; 88: 611–21.
6Saelan, H, Moller, L, Koster, A. Alcohol consumption in a Danish cohort during 11 years. Scand. J. Soc. Med. 1992; 20: 8793.
7Kubicka, L, Csemy, L, Duplinsky, J, Kozeny, J. Czech men's drinking in changing political climates 1983–93: a three-wave longitudinal study. Addiction 1998; 93: 1219–30.
8Levenson, MR, Aldwin, CM, Spiro, A. Age, cohort and period effects on alcohol consumption and problem drinking: findings from the Normative Aging Study. J. Stud. Alcohol. 1998; 59: 712–22.
9Lemmens, PH. Measuring lifetime drinking histories. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 1998; 22: 29S36S.
10Riboli, E, Hunt, KJ, Slimani, N, Ferrari, P, Norat, T, Fahey, M, et al. European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): study populations and data collection. Public Health Nutr. 2002; 5(6B): 1113–24.
11Riboli, E, Kaaks, R. The EPIC Project: rationale and study design. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S6–14.
12Slimani, N, Deharveng, G, Charrondière, RU, van Kappel, AL, Ocké, MC, Welch, A, et al. Structure of the standardized computerized 24-h diet recall interview used as reference method in the 22 centers participating in the EPIC project. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Comput. Meth. Programs Biomed. 1999; 58: 251–66.
13Slimani, N, Ferrari, P, Ocké, M, Welch, A, Boeing, H, van Liere, M, et al. Standardization of the 24-hour diet recall calibration method used in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): general concepts and preliminary results. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 2000; 54: 900–17.
14Midanik, LT. Validity of self-reported alcohol use: a literature review and assessment. Br. J. Addict. 1988; 83: 1019–30.
15Feunekes, GI, van't Veer, P, van Staveren, WA, Kok, FJ. Alcohol intake assessment: the sober facts. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1999; 150: 105–12.
16Rehm, J. Measuring quantity, frequency, and volume of drinking. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 1998; 22: 4S14S.
17Productschap voor Gedistilleerde Dranken. World Drink Trends. Henley-on-Thames, UK: NTC Publications, 1999.
18Klipstein-Grobusch, K, Becker, N, Kroke, A, Boeing, H. Patterns of past alcohol consumption in the EPIC–Germany cohorts. European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Ann. Nutr. Metab. 1999; 43: 258–65.
19Kroke, A, Klipstein-Grobusch, K, Voss, S, Möseneder, J, Thielecke, F, Noack, R, et al. Validation of a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire administered in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study: comparison of energy, protein, and macronutrient intakes estimated with the doubly labeled water, urinary nitrogen, and repeated 24-h dietary recall methods. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1999; 70: 439–47.
20Ocké, MC, Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB, Pols, MA, Smit HA, van Staveren, WA, Kromhout, D. The Dutch EPIC food frequency questionnaire. II. Relative validity and reproducibility for nutrients. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S49–58.
21Ocké, MC, Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB, Goddijn, HE, et al. The Dutch EPIC food frequency questionnaire. I. Description of the questionnaire, and relative validity and reproducibility for food groups. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S37–48.
22Bohlscheid-Thomas, S, Hoting, I, Boeing, H, Wahrendorf, J. Reproducibility and relative validity of energy and macronutrient intake of a food frequency questionnaire developed for the German part of the EPIC project. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S71–81.
23Bohlscheid-Thomas, S, Hoting, I, Boeing, H, Wahrendorf, J. Reproducibility and relative validity of food group intake in a food frequency questionnaire developed for the German part of the EPIC project. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S59–70.
24EPIC Group of Spain. Relative validity and reproducibility of a diet history questionnaire in Spain. I. Foods. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S91–9.
25EPIC Group of Spain. Relative validity and reproducibility of a diet history questionnaire in Spain. II. Nutrients. European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S100–9.
26Katsouyanni, K, Rimm, EB, Gnardellis, C, Trichopoulos, D, Polychronopoulos, E, Trichopoulou, A. Reproducibility and relative validity of an extensive semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire using dietary records and biochemical markers among Greek schoolteachers. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S118–27.
27Van Liere, MJ, Lucas, F, Clavel, F, Slimani, N, Villeminot, S. Relative validity and reproducibility of a French dietary history questionnaire. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S128–36.
28Pisani, P, Faggiano, F, Krogh, V, Palli, D, Vineis, P, Berrino, F. Relative validity and reproducibility of a food frequency dietary questionnaire for use in the Italian EPIC centres. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S152–60.
29Riboli, E, Elmstahl, S, Saracci, R, Gullberg, B, Lindgarde, F. The Malmö Food Study: validity of two dietary assessment methods for measuring nutrient intake. Int. J. Epidemiol. 1997; 26: S161–73.
30Giovannucci, E, Colditz, G, Stampfer, MJ, Rimm, EB, Litin, L, Sampson, L, et al. The assessment of alcohol consumption by a simple self-administered questionnaire. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1991; 133: 810–7.
31Liu, S, Serdula, MK, Byers, T, Williamson, DF, Mokdad, AH, Flanders, WD. Reliability of alcohol intake as recalled from 10 years in the past. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1996; 143: 177–86.
32Longnecker, MP, Newcomb, PA, Mittendorf, R, Greenberg, ER, Clapp, RW, Bogdan, G, et al. The reliability of self-reported alcohol consumption in the remote past. Epidemiology 1992; 3: 535–9.
33Lee, MM, Whittemore, AS, Lung, DL. Reliability of recalled physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption. Ann. Epidemiol. 1992; 2: 705–14.
34Czarnecki, DM, Russell, M, Cooper, ML, Salter, D. Five-year reliability of self-reported alcohol consumption. J. Stud. Alcohol. 1990; 51: 6876.
35Simpura, J, Poikolainen, K. Accuracy of retrospective measurement of individual alcohol consumption in men; a reinterview after 18 years. J. Stud. Alcohol. 1983; 44: 911–7.
36Thompson, FE, Lamphiear, DE, Metzner, HL, Hawthorne, VM, Oh, MS. Reproducibility of reports of frequency of food use in the Tecumseh Diet Methodology Study. Am. J. Epidemiol. 1987; 125: 658–71.
37Caetano, R. Cultural and subgroup issues in measuring consumption. Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 1998; 22: 21S–8S.
38Hupkens, CL, Knibbe, RA, Drop, MJ. Alcohol consumption in the European community: uniformity and diversity in drinking patterns. Addiction 1993; 88: 1391–404.
39Norström, T. Alcohol in Postwar Europe: Consumption and Drinking Patterns, Consequences and Policy Responses in 15 European Countries. Stockholm: European Commission, 2001.
40Sieri, S, Agudo, A, Kesse, E, Klipstein-Grobusch, K, San-José, B, Welch, AA, et al. Patterns of alcohol consumption in 10 European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project. Public Health Nutr. 2002; 5(6B): 1287–96.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed