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Top food sources of percentage of energy, nutrients to limit and total gram amount consumed among US adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2014

  • Ana Carolina Leme (a1) (a2), Tom Baranowski (a2), Debbe Thompson (a2), Sonia Philippi (a1), Carol O’Neil (a3), Victor Fulgoni (a4) and Theresa Nicklas (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

To identify most commonly consumed foods by adolescents contributing to percentage of total energy, added sugars, SFA, Na and total gram intake per day.

Design

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011–2014.

Setting

NHANES is a cross-sectional study nationally representative of the US population.

Participants

One 24 h dietary recall was used to assess dietary intake of 3156 adolescents aged 10–19 years. What We Eat in America food category classification system was used for all foods consumed. Food sources of energy, added sugars, SFA, Na and total gram amount consumed were sample-weighted and ranked based on percentage contribution to intake of total amount.

Results

Three-highest ranked food subgroup sources of total energy consumed were: sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB; 7·8 %); sweet bakery products (6·9 %); mixed dishes – pizza (6·6 %). Highest ranked food sources of total gram amount consumed were: plain water (33·1 %); SSB (15·8 %); milk (7·2 %). Three highest ranked food sources of total Na were: mixed dishes – pizza (8·7 %); mixed dishes – Mexican (6·7 %); cured meats/poultry (6·6 %). Three highest ranked food sources of SFA were: mixed dishes – pizza (9·1 %); sweet bakery products (8·3 %); mixed dishes – Mexican (7·9 %). Three highest ranked food sources of added sugars were: SSB (42·1 %); sweet bakery products (12·1 %); coffee and tea (7·6 %).

Conclusions

Identifying current food sources of percentage energy, nutrients to limit and total gram amount consumed among US adolescents is critical for designing strategies to help them meet nutrient recommendations within energy needs.

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email tnicklas@bcm.edu

References

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Top food sources of percentage of energy, nutrients to limit and total gram amount consumed among US adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2014

  • Ana Carolina Leme (a1) (a2), Tom Baranowski (a2), Debbe Thompson (a2), Sonia Philippi (a1), Carol O’Neil (a3), Victor Fulgoni (a4) and Theresa Nicklas (a2)...

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